Cap-Haïtien

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Cap-Haïtien

(käp-äēsyăN`), city (1995 est. pop. 100,600), N Haiti, on the Atlantic Ocean. Haiti's second largest city, it is a seaport, commercial center, and tourist attraction. Agriculture dominates the regional economy, with sisal, sugar, coffee, cacao, bananas, and pineapples as the major commercial crops. Founded by the French in 1670, the city was the capital of colonial Haiti for a century. In 1791, Cap-Haïtien was captured by Toussaint Louverture, leader of a slave rebellion. From 1811 to 1820 it served as capital of the kingdom of Henri Christophe, whose Sans Souci Palace and famous citadel, La Ferrière, still stand. Despite earthquakes (notably in 1842), bombings, and civil strife, Cap-Haïtien retains some picturesque colonial charm. It is also known as Le Cap.

Cap-Haïtien

 

a city and port in the north of Haiti. Population, 37, 000 (1967).

Cap-Haïtien is the commercial center of an agricultural re-gion. Coffee, sugar, and fruit are exported.

Cap-Haitien

a port in N Haiti: capital during the French colonial period. Pop.: 134 000 (2005 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
After describing the complex, explosive politics of Cap Francais, Popkin gives an intricately detailed account of the fighting of June 20-24, 1793 that pitted supporters of Sonthonax and Polverel against those of the newly-appointed governor, Francois-Thomas Galbaud.
Judging from his description, the family's property was probably on or near the island's north coast, in the Terrier Rouge parish between the colony's main city of Cap Francais and the smaller port of Fort Dauphin (MO 1:36).
The third book of "Mon Odyssee" describes his involvement in the political quarrels that divided the island's whites in 1792 and that were the prelude to the assault launched by the French general Francois-Thomas Galbaud and the sailors in Cap Francais harbor against the republican civil commissioners Leger-Felicite Sonthonax and Etienne Polverel on June 20, 1793, the event that provoked the first official French offer of freedom to the colony's slaves.
While they hoped reforms would end the slave revolt, white resistance in Cap Francais found a focus in May when Galbaud arrived as Saint-Domingue's new military governor.
Different from the easily dominated plantation societies of the Lesser Antilles, the mountainous topography of Saint Domingue made it notoriously difficult to govern from the seat of colonial administration in Cap Francais, especially so in the isolated southern peninsula.
Among black authors, Louverture's son Isaac wrote an interesting memoir on his participation in the Leclerc expedition and Jean-Jacques Dessalines published two accounts of the capture of Port-au-Prince and Cap Francais in 1803.
Only after the first burning of Cap Francais (1793), which sent 10,000 French refugees to U.