Cape Breton Highlands National Park


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Cape Breton Highlands National Park

(brĕt`ən), 367 sq mi (951 sq km), N Cape Breton Island, N. S., Canada; est. 1936. It covers a large tableland and includes sections of the rugged Atlantic coastline.
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Cape Breton Highlands National Park


Ingonish Beach, NS B0C1L0
Phone:902-224-2306
Fax:902-285-2866
Web: www.pc.gc.ca/pn-np/ns/cbreton
Size: 948 sq. km.
Established: 1936.
Location:Park stretches across the northern tip of Cape Breton Island between the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the Atlantic Ocean. Entrances are located on the Cabot Trail north of Cheticamp (west side of the Island) and at Ingonish Beach (east).
Facilities:Visitor center, 25 hiking trails, 6 campgrounds (including full hookups and showers), exhibits, 18-hole golf course.
Activities:Hiking, camping (year-round), ocean and freshwater swimming, fishing, nature and interpretive programs, wildlife viewing, cross-country skiing (40 km of trails), tobogganing, bicycling, golfing, tennis.
Special Features:Park is known for its spectacular highlands and ocean scenery. The first national park established in the Atlantic provinces features some of the last remaining protected wilderness in Nova Scotia. The 113-km Cabot Trail traverses the park from Chéticamp to Ingonish, offering numerous lookoffs, roadside exhibits, walking trails, and scenic side routes.

See other parks in Nova Scotia.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
An assessment of landslide potential in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park: a GIS approach.
We acknowledge the valuable contributions of Geordon Harvey and Dawn Allen who provided GIS support, Dave Mealiea who assisted in the fieldwork, and James Bridgland, Cape Breton Highlands National Park. Funding for this project was provided by Parks Canada.
The most travelled route by tourists is the 300-km long Cabot Trail (named after the Italian explorer and British subject who may or may not have reached the shores of Cape Breton), which loops around the island's scenic northern peninsula and encloses Cape Breton Highlands National Park.
Sightings of moose were sporadic through the late 1950s amounting to < 10 animals per year, but increased through the 1960s regularly surpassing 20 sightings after 1964, reaching 57 in 1969 (Warden Service, Cape Breton Highlands National Park, unpublished wildlife observation data).
The conference field trip included a drive around the picturesque Cabot Trail, with stops to see intensively browsed habitat within Cape Breton Highlands National Park. After the close of the conference at noon on Friday, about 30 delegates travelled as a group to Fort Louisbourg National Historic Park for an enjoyable afternoon of sunshine and large waves, history, and of course more seafood.
In the Cape Breton Highlands, incisor samples were obtained from hunters during the 2001 hunting season from management zones immediately north and south of Cape Breton Highlands National Park (Fig.