Capek


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Capek

Karel . 1890--1938, Czech dramatist and novelist; author of R.U.R. (1921), which introduced the word "robot", and (with his brother Josef) The Insect Play (1921).
References in periodicals archive ?
In The Road to Wigan Pier, he cites Capek approvingly as a critic of mechanical progress for its own sake.
The ancient Israelites may have hankered after the Golden Calt; but Czechs prefer their fantasies to be earthier, basted in golden juices, enfolded in the magical but also palpable, as homely as the ingredients of a Capek painting and so, true to life, yet hinting at grander and richer possibilities.
Janacek's opera is based on a comic play by Karel Capek, and director Nikolaus Lehnhoff and his set and costume designer Tobias Hoheisel have accommodated the tale's black humor.
Capek's solution is the replacement of the human by the machine.
Turney traces the Frankenstein metaphor through generations of scientific research and imaginative literature on the future of genetics, including Karel Capek's R.U.R.
From his closing and considered peroration about British characteristics I detach this quotation from Karel Capek: 'English cooking lacks a lightness and floweriness, joie de vivre, melodiousness and sinful voluptuousness.
Many writers have commented on the failure of current cataloging and classification practices to adequately describe interdisciplinary materials, and some have proposed alternatives or reforms fin the field of women's studies, for instance, see Marshall, 1977; Capek, 1987, Mowery, 1989;, Olson, 1992).
Capek studied philosophy in Prague, Berlin, and Paris and in 1917 settled in Prague as a writer and journalist.
"We live in the very centre of Central Europe," Havel wrote recently, "in a place that from the beginning of time has been the main European crossroads of every possible interest, invasion, and influence of a political, military, ethnic, religious, or cultural nature" He added, "Our historical experience has even made us somewhat prescient: many admonitory visions of the future - Kafkas and Capek's, for instance - have come from here ..." in this spirit, Havel warned Europe and America that the appeasement of the ultra-nationalist forces carving up Bosnia would only embolden them further; now, at long last, some concerted, effective action has been taken to stop the slaughter.
The word robot (from a Czech word for "serf" or "slave") had been invented by the Czech playwright Karel Capek (1890-1938) in his play R.U.R., first staged in Europe in 1920.
(Rossum's Universal Robots), a play by the Czech writer Karel Capek, translated by Paul Selver and Nigel Playfair, opened at the Garrick Theatre in New York City.
Until the dawning of 1990, it had been a long death for Karel Capek. His heart had broken the moment Neville Chamberlain left Munich in 1938, and his body, wracked from adolescence by a spinal disease, succumbed to pneumonia by the end of that year of dread for Czechoslovakia, the land of his birth and his career and his deepest loyalty.