Capgras syndrome

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Capgras syndrome

[′käp·grəz ‚sin‚drōm]
(psychology)
A delusional misidentification syndrome commonly seen in schizophrenia that causes the individual to replace a familiar person (usually the spouse) with an impostor with the same or similar physical appearance.
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After 17 bitemporal sessions, psychosis with Capgras delusion persisted, maintaining high risk of aggression against her family and the need to remain hospitalized.
Gambini, "Capgras delusion for animals and inanimate objects in Parkinson's Disease: A case report," BMC Psychiatry, vol.
The Capgras delusion is a psychiatric disorder characterised by the belief that one's friends, relatives and peers have been replaced by lookalikes.
Butler, "Diurnal variation in Cotard's syndrome (copresent with Capgras delusion) following traumatic brain injury," Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, vol.
Capgras delusion also offers a good test of the deficit theory.
They argued Kot suffered from paranoia and other acute symptoms associated with Capgras delusion, a misidentification syndrome common in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia.
In Chapters 5 and 6 he discusses, respectively, the Capgras delusion (the belief that familiars have been replaced by impostors) and Cotard delusion (the view that one is dead or otherwise disembodied or non-existent), while in Chapter 7, based on the work of Louis Sass, he considers schizophrenia.