Capgras syndrome


Also found in: Medical.

Capgras syndrome

[′käp·grəz ‚sin‚drōm]
(psychology)
A delusional misidentification syndrome commonly seen in schizophrenia that causes the individual to replace a familiar person (usually the spouse) with an impostor with the same or similar physical appearance.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Neurodegenerative syndromes are neuropsychiatric disorders that very frequently include psychotic symptoms, such as paranoid delusions, delusions of marital infidelity, Capgras syndrome, or folie a deux.
Additionally, literature describes "Capgras syndrome" - experiencing that acquaintances are replaced by similar persons, "Fragola syndrome" - experiencing that acquaintances are disguised as strangers and "reduplicative paramnesia" when patients have the impression of duplicated place or location [28].
Capgras syndrome (CS), late-onset schizophrenia (LOS) and refractory schizophrenia are relatively common conditions in psychiatric practice.
Neurologists and other researchers from Europe and the US discuss Ganser syndrome; Cotard syndrome; Capgras syndrome and other delusional misidentification syndromes; De Clerambault syndrome, Othello syndrome, Folie C deux, and variants; Couvade syndrome; possessions; conversion, factitious disorder, and malingering; Munchausen syndrome; camptocormia; glossolalia and aphasia; violent behavior; culture-specific hyperstartle-plus syndromes; the dancing manias or mass psychogenic illness; and the Alice-in-Wonderland syndrome.
Capgras syndrome is a delusional disorder characterized by The belief that a familiar person has been replaced by a visually similar imposter or replica.
Knott's pots with Capgras syndrome are only two of the chapter's many delights.
Benson, "Capgras Syndrome: A Reduplicative Phenomenon", en: Neurology, v.
Besides that, associations of CS with other syndromes are described, such as catatonic syndrome [18], malignant neuroleptic syndrome [19], lycanthropy [20], hydrophobia [21], and capgras syndrome [22, 23].
Following a head injury after he crashes his truck, protagonist Mark Schluter, a 27-year-old meatpacker, develops Capgras Syndrome, a condition characterized primarily by the conviction that others--including his older sister Karin, who leaves her consumer-relations job at a computer company to come home to care for him--are imposters.
He is diagnosed with Capgras syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by the belief that loved ones are doubles, robots, or other imposters.
Casebook Capgras syndrome Capgras Syndrome is like waking up in horror film Invasion Of The Bodysnatchers.
Other examples include Jonathan Lethem's Motherless Brooklyn (1999), in which the protagonist has Tourette's syndrome; Mark Haddon's Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (2003), narrated by an autistic teenager; and Rivka Galchen's Atmospheric Disturbances (2008), about a man who suffers from Capgras syndrome and stops recognizing his wife.