capillary

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Related to Capillary beds: continuous capillaries

capillary

capillary (kăpˈəlĕrˌē), microscopic blood vessel, smallest unit of the circulatory system. Capillaries form a network of tiny tubes throughout the body, connecting arterioles (smallest arteries) and venules (smallest veins). Through the thin capillary walls, which are composed of a single layer of cells, the nutritive material and oxygen in the blood pass into the body tissues, and waste matter and carbon dioxide in turn are absorbed from the tissues into the bloodstream.
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capillary

[′kap·ə‚ler·ē]
(anatomy)
The smallest vessel of both the circulatory and lymphatic systems; the walls are composed of a single cell layer.
(geology)
A fissure or a crack in a formation which provides a route for flow of water or hydrocarbons.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

capillary

1. (of tubes) having a fine bore
2. Anatomy of or relating to any of the delicate thin-walled blood vessels that form an interconnecting network between the arterioles and the venules
3. Physics of or relating to capillarity
4. Anatomy any of the capillary blood vessels
5. a fine hole or narrow passage in any substance
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
While dorsal and caudal cavities own capillary meshes similar to those of principal chambers anterior and inferior cavities reveal a very different capillary bed (Fig.
It occurs when arteries lose their youthful suppleness, leaving us with narrowed arteries incapable of regulating blood flow and pressure, and in turn damaging the fragile capillary beds that nourish our organs.
Although the transition between arterial and venous blood typically occurs in a capillary bed, direct connections (arteriovenous anastomoses) between a small artery and vein permit a short-circuiting of capillary beds (Figure 3-9).
A dense capillary bed projects within the medulla between the afferent (descending) and efferent (ascending) vasa recta.
A Excessive squeezing of capillary beds during capillary blood collection adds tissue fluid to the specimens in variable quantities.
Arteriovenous malformations are vascular defects caused by the absence of normal capillary beds, which leads to the development of abnormal blood channels that connect the arterial circulation to the venous circulation.
"This enzyme is fixed in the capillary beds, the small blood vessels, and as the lipids pass by they get hydrolyzed, or broken down, by this enzyme.
When it senses a cold core temperature, the system shuts down the body's radiators -- capillary beds just under the skin surface -- that allow for heat transfer.
But radiation damage, a crushing injury or diabetes can destroy the small capillary beds, limiting oxygen flow and subsequent healing.
In youth, our arteries are flexible and readily expand and contract with each heartbeat as do our delicate capillary beds. As you can see by the illustration on this page, arteries narrow into smaller arterioles that eventually thin further down to microscopic capillaries.
As the steroid bound to its binding protein percolates through the capillary beds of tissues, a small fraction (about 1%-3%) of the steroid is released into the interstitial tissues and then into target tissues/cells (e.g., estradiol enters the epithelium of the breast and uterus).