capillary wave

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capillary wave

[′kap·ə‚ler·ē ‚wāv]
(fluid mechanics)
A wave occurring at the interface between two fluids, such as the interface between air and water on oceans and lakes, in which the principal restoring force is controlled by surface tension.
A water wave of less than 1.7 centimeters. Also known as capillary ripple; ripple.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the full irrotational water wave system with surface tension and no gravity in two dimensions (the capillary waves systems), Ionescu and Pusateri prove global regularity and modified scattering for suitably small and localized perturbations of a flat interface.
Impact from a water drop causes an upward "rebound" jet surrounded by circular capillary waves -- Wikimedia Commons CAIRO -- 2 December 2018: Egypt has won a seat on the Board of Governors 2019 -- 2021 of the World Water Council, as Chairman of the National Water Research Center (NWRC) Ramadan Khaled became member of the government organizations quota.
In place of the beam of ultrasonic waves, when spraying in the fountain on the surface of the jet excited capillary waves. The reason for the excitation of capillary waves are pressure surges due to the collapse of cavitation bubbles.
Two mechanisms were considered by various researchers for atomization, breaking up of capillary waves at the liquid surface and cavitation.
Vanden-Broeck, "Large-amplitude capillary waves in electrified fluid sheets," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, no.
However, actual sea surface is usually assumed to be two-scale rough surface model [10]: capillary waves modulated by gravity wave in large scale.
Capillary waves feather the surface in concentric circles, obscure infant oyster-beds by the culinary island, reduce schools of red minnow to rust streaks.
The interaction of incident radar waves with the capillary waves (millimeter level), whose restoring force is the surface tension of the water, is not accounted for, as the waves of this size are not detectable by the Waverider buoy.
Thermal capillary waves cause fluid droplets to coalesce with a fluid substrate by film drainage at the interface, breakage of the film, and intrusion of the particle into the bulk phase (Aarts et al.