Capitol

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Capitol,

seat of the U.S. government at Washington, D.C. It is the city's dominating monument, built on an elevated site that was chosen by George Washington in consultation with Major Pierre L'EnfantL'Enfant, Pierre Charles
, 1754–1825, American soldier, engineer, and architect. Born in France, he volunteered as a private in the American Revolution. He won Gen. Washington's attention with his design for the insignia of the Society of the Cincinnati.
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. The building as it now stands took many years to build and is the result of the work of several architects. In 1792 a competition was held to select an architect, but William ThorntonThornton, William,
1759–1828, American architect, b. Tortola, British Virgin Islands, He studied (1781–84) medicine at Edinburgh but received his medical degree (1784) at the Univ. of Aberdeen. In 1787 he emigrated to the United States and became a citizen in 1788.
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 gained the president's approval with a plan separately submitted and was appointed. In 1793 the president set the cornerstone, with Masonic rites, and the building was begun. Later three additional architects were employed—E. S. HalletHallet, Étienne Sulpice
, 1755–1825, French architect. He emigrated c.1789 to the United States, where he became known as Stephen Hallet. Before the opening of the public competition for the design of the Capitol, at Washington, D.C.
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, George Hadfield (d.1826), and James HobanHoban, James
, c.1762–1831, American architect, b. Ireland. By 1789, Hoban had immigrated to the United States. He designed the South Carolina statehouse, which was burned in 1865. In 1792 he moved to Washington, D.C.
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. In 1814 the uncompleted building was burned by the British, and B. H. LatrobeLatrobe, Benjamin Henry
(Benjamin Henry Boneval Latrobe) , 1764–1820, American architect, b. Yorkshire, England. He is considered the first professional architect in the United States.
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, who had been appointed (1803) surveyor of public buildings, undertook its restoration. He was succeeded in 1818 by Charles BulfinchBulfinch, Charles,
1763–1844, American architect, b. Boston. A member of the Boston board of selectmen in 1791, he was chosen chairman in 1799—an office equivalent to mayor and held by Bulfinch for 19 years.
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, who brought the design to completion in 1830.

The building proved inadequate in size and was greatly enlarged (1851–65) by T. U. WalterWalter, Thomas Ustick,
1804–87, American architect, b. Philadelphia. In 1819 he entered the office of William Strickland in Philadelphia as a student. In 1830 he began practice, the county prison (1831) at Moyamensing, Philadelphia co., being his first important work.
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, who added the extensive House and Senate wings at either end and the imposing dome, c.288 ft (90 m) in height, which dominates the composition. Elaborate murals depicting a variety of inspirational American subjects, painted (1854–79) by the Italian-born fresco artist Constantino Brumidi (1805–80), adorn much of the Capitol's interior. The building proper is over 750 ft (229 m) long, including approaches c.350 ft (110 m) wide. In 1960 the east front of the Capitol was extended 32 ft (9.8 m), and the original sandstone facade was replaced by marble. The greater Capitol Complex includes (in addition to the Capitol itself) 274 acres (111 hectares) of grounds with gardens, monuments, memorials, a carillon, and fountains; the United States Botanic Gardens (est. 1820), one of the oldest such gardens in the nation, although the present conservatory dates only to 1933; the several House and Senate office buildings; the buildings of the Library of Congress; and the Supreme Court building.

Bibliography

See I. T. Frary, They Built the Capitol (1940); U.S. Capitol Historical Society, We, the People (11th ed. 2011); G. Gugliotta, Freedom's Cap: The United States Capitol and the Coming of the Civil War (2012).


Capitol,

in Rome: see Capitoline HillCapitoline Hill
or Capitol,
highest of the seven hills of ancient Rome, historic and religious center of the city. The great temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, on its southern summit, was dedicated in 509 B.C.; it was foremost among the temples and altars of Rome.
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.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Capitol

The building in which a state legislature assembles. An important building type, seat of all state governments, almost all centered on a high dome with flanking lower wings, built of masonry in a classical style, and need continual restoration to maintain the proper civic image.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Capitol

 

a building in Washington, D.C., the capital of the USA, where the US Congress meets. It was built in the classical style during the years 1793–1865 (architects W. Thornton, B. Latrobe, and T. Walter). The buildings in the US state capitals where the legislative assemblies meet are also called capitols.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

capitol

Official meeting place for a legislative body.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Capitol

1. 
a. another name for the Capitoline
b. the temple on the Capitoline
2. the. the main building of the US Congress
3. (in the US) the building housing any state legislature
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Well - dressed and very quiet looking experts entered Liberia's Capitol Building Wednesday, visiting House Speaker Bhofal Chambers' office and later inviting those that they may consider 'interest to the investigation' to talk on the first floor in the conference room of the main building of the Capitol.
Construction began on the current Capitol building in 1868 and was finished in 1888, although lawmakers moved in about halfway through the construction process.
Montejo said initial investigation revealed that policemen who were at the capitol building were alerted by the robbery, prompting them to respond and engage the fleeing robbers.
Dressed in a simple outfit of black silk, he arrived at the Capitol Building March 4, 1805, in a plain carriage accompanied only by his private secretary and a groom to see to the horses.
THE dome of the US Capitol building is comparable with St Paul's Cathedral and not the White House, which does not have a great dome (Page 30, September 26).
Maryland, which exports about 4,000 tons now, has enough funding to export 20,000 tons-that's enough to fill the state Capitol building. The waste is an attractive (as it were) alternative to commercial fertilizer for corn, soybeans and small grains.
"This is an assault on the institution of marriage," he proclaimed to the Los Angeles Times from his recently established base just yards from Vermont's gold-domed capitol building in Montpelier.
The new leader also acquires "two luxurious suites" in the Capitol Building in addition to his regular congressional offices in the Rayburn Building.
The man who shot dead two policemen at the US Capitol building is recovering from his injuries, doctors said yesterday.
Four people were wounded last night in a gun battle inside the US Capitol building in Washington.
The signing at the Benguet Capitol building came after a unity walk from the Benguet State University to the Benguet Capitol.

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