Capitoline Hill

(redirected from Capitolium)

Capitoline Hill

(kăp`ĭtəlīn') or

Capitol,

highest of the seven hills of ancient Rome, historic and religious center of the city. The great temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, on its southern summit, was dedicated in 509 B.C.; it was foremost among the temples and altars of Rome. Destroyed three times by fire, it was last rebuilt by the emperor Domitian. On the northern summit of the Capitol was the citadel (arx). On the side overlooking the Forum stood the Tabularium, where the state archives were kept. Until the 1st cent. A.D., state criminals were hurled to their death from the Tarpeian Rock, on the steep south face of the hill. In the Middle Ages the Capitol remained the political center of Rome. The center of municipal government in modern Rome is on the same location. In the 16th cent. Michelangelo designed the present plan. A flight of steps leads to the square on top of the hill; on one side of the square is the Palazzo dei Conservatori, on the other, the Capitoline Museum. Both buildings now house collections of antiquities. In the center of the square is the ancient equestrian bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are dozens of real estate agencies with American flags on their windows and names such as "Komerican Realty," while two of the new housing developments outside the base are called "Lincoln Palace" and "Capitolium".
Campidoglio has two summits, the Capitolium and the Arx, which close in the Asylum that was a place of refuge for refugees around the world.
In ancient Rome this place was known as Capitolium, in English the Capitol.
The main building (1832) was built next to the town square, where the Capitolium and the Dome Church are located (Haila, 2008).
[47] Capitolium illud templis tribus inlustratum, paternis atque etiam huius amplissimis donis ornati aditus Iovis optimi maximi, unonis Reginae, Minervae M.
Si e potuto infatti riscontrare che nel passo incentrato sulla descrizione del Pandemonium, (37) (libro primo) il termine Capitol (usato da Milton in analogia a Capitolium) viene trasformato in Capital, nella prima e nella seconda edizione.
In an issue of Capitolium, the organ of Rome's city council, there was even admission that, through the Renaissance and after, Rome was not the dynamo of sporting endeavour in the peninsula; a half acknowledgement of many Italians' suspicions that their national capital was not the 'real' fount of anything that brought them gain or pleasure.
"Roma contro Roma." Capitolium 17.11 (1942): 331-334.
In Dougga, such a stele would have provided an irresistible association with the city's own Capitolium, with its eagle-borne apotheosis of Antoninus Pius (fig.