Capnocytophaga


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Capnocytophaga

[‚kap·nō‚sī′täf·ə·gə]
(microbiology)
A genus of bacteria comprising fusiform, fermentative, gram-negative rods which require carbon dioxide for growth and show gliding motility.
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies have shown that Capnocytophaga bacteremia is associated with severe oral pathology and neutropenia, which can also result in abscess, fulminant sepsis, lung abscess, endocarditis, and meningitis [9-12].
Capnocytophaga canimorsus septicemia: fifth report of a catassociated infection and five other cases.
Capnocytophaga canimorsus is the main human pathogen associated with dog bites; this organism causes septicemia, meningitis, endocarditis, and rare ocular infections (3,4).
Another pathogen that likewise causes severe [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] infection in hosts with elevated iron is Capnocytophaga canimorsis.
Although rare, the bacteria Capnocytophaga canis, which occurs naturally in dogs' mouths and is estimated to be in up to 70% of dogs, can be transmitted to humans through bites, scratches, or licks that come into contact with open wounds or mucous membranes.
"Rarely, Capnocytophaga germs can spread to people through bites, scratches, or close contact from a dog or cat and may cause illness, including sepsis," the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (https://www.cdc.gov/capnocytophaga/index.html) said.
An emerging zoonotic cause of sepsis, endocarditis, and meningitis is Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a Gram (-) bacterium first named in 1989.
Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a gram-negative, rod-shaped, usually commensal bacteria of dog and cat oral flora that causes rare but potentially severe infections in humans (1,2).
When he was eventually taken to the hospital, doctors found he had contracted a rare blood infection caused by capnocytophaga bacteria that are commonly found in the saliva of cats and dogs and that rarely lead to people getting sick.
Doctors diagnosed Manteufel with a rare blood infection caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus, which is commonly found in the saliva of most healthy dogs and is usually not harmful to humans, the Post reported.
Jaco, of Chorlton, Manchester, developed sepsis after a rare reaction to Capnocytophaga canimorsus, carried by up to three-quarters of dogs.
Others are facultative anaerobes such as Capnocytophaga, Eikenella, Neisseria, among others.