CAP

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cap

1. Sport chiefly Brit
a. an emblematic hat or beret given to someone chosen for a representative team
b. a player chosen for such a team
2. the upper part of a pedestal in a classical order
3. Botany the pileus of a mushroom or toadstool
4. Hunting
a. money contributed to the funds of a hunt by a follower who is neither a subscriber nor a farmer, in return for a day's hunting
b. a collection taken at a meet of hounds, esp for a charity
5. Anatomy
a. the natural enamel covering a tooth
b. an artificial protective covering for a tooth
6. an upper financial limit
7. a mortarboard when worn with a gown at an academic ceremony (esp in the phrase cap and gown)
8. Meteorol
a. the cloud covering the peak of a mountain
b. the transient top of detached clouds above an increasing cumulus

CAP

Common Agricultural Policy: (in the EU) the system for supporting farm incomes by maintaining agricultural prices at agreed levels

Cap

The top member of any vertical architectural element; often projecting, with a drip for protection from the weather; the coping of a wall, the top of a pedestal or buttress, or the lintel of a door.

What does it mean when you dream about a cap?

A hat, a cover over an oil well, a snow-capped mountain, a nightcap for sleeping, or a nightcap before bed may all indicate sense of completion of some issue, job well done, or a mission accomplished.

cap

[kap]
(engineering)
A detonating or blasting cap.
(genetics)
In many eukaryotic messenger ribonucleic acids, the structure at the 5′ end consisting of 7′-methyl-guanosine-pppX, where X is the first nucleotide encoded in the deoxyribonucleic acid; it is added posttranscriptionally.
(mathematics)
The symbol ∩, which indicates the intersection of two sets.
(mining engineering)
A piece of timber placed on top of a prop or post in a mine.
The horizontal section of a set of timber that is used as a support in a mine roadway.

Cap

(astronomy)

cap

1. Usually, the topmost member of any vertical architectural element, often projecting, with a drip as protection from the weather, e.g., the coping of a wall, top of a pedestal or buttress, the lintel of a door, etc.
2. A layer of concrete placed over rock in the bottom of foundation excavations to level the exposed surface, prevent its deterioration by weathering, and protect it from other damage.
3. The upper member of a column, pilaster, door cornice, molding, and the like; also called cap trim, wainscot cap, dado cap, chair rail cap, capital.
4. A fitting used to close the top end of a tubular newel.
6. A fitting used to close the end of a pipe.
7. A plane surface which is bonded to the bearing surface of a test specimen during its strength testing to ensure a uniform load distribution.

CAP

(networking)

CAP

(communications)

CAP

(networking)

CAP

(1) (Competitive Access Provider) An organization that competes with the established telecommunications provider in an area.

(2) (Carrierless Amplitude Phase) A type of ADSL service. See DSL.

(3) (CAMEL Application Part) The protocol used to implement CAMEL functions in the GSM system. CAP is the CAMEL counterpart of the INAP protocol and resides at the same level in the SS7 protocol suite. See INAP and CAMEL.
References in periodicals archive ?
From left, Craig Hopwood, Scott Capper, Michael Ward and Daniel Howarth
On the night she vanished, security cameras show her leaving the glitzy club at 6am accompanied by a bald and "thick" man, alleged to be Capper.
From left, Tom Capper and Neal Jackson, of Capper Jackson, who have set up shop at Birchwood Park
One of the real strengths of Capper's study lies in his willingness to summarize the arguments of Fuller's major texts and then evaluate their cultural and historical significance.
But just how widespread and accessible heroin was to get hold of came as a huge shock to Capper.
For Capper, Fuller's "two primary intellectual constructs of formalist-organicist criticism and rights-minded androgyny" both supported her fundamental Romantic "cosmopolitan literary patriotism" (520).
Before CCS, Capper served as national sales director in Bayer Healthcare's diabetes care division.
Capper launches his project with Carlyle's famous line about Fuller's "predetermination to eat the universe as her egg or oyster." Her appetite, he argues in his first volume, The Private Years, was whetted by the passion for learning instilled by her scholar/politician father and her own "extracurricular" exploration with Harvard friends of European, especially German, Romanticism.
In addition, Capper adds, Mooter continuously skews the results in response to the user's actions or (interpreted) underlying intentions, thereby pushing relevant results nearer to the top.
"Consumers loved the fact that the original Swiffer WetJet was easy to use and picked up most things," recalled Dawn Capper, assistant brand manager for Swiffer.
introduces its NERCC-TR Rotary Chuck Capper with Torque Read-out and Torque Control capability.
Charles Capper's Margaret Fuller: An American Romantic Life takes us well beyond these still familiar stereotypes.