capture

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capture

1. Physics a process by which an atom, molecule, ion, or nucleus acquires an additional particle
2. Geography the process by which the headwaters of one river are diverted into another through erosion caused by the second river's tributaries
3. Computing the act or process of inserting or transferring data into a computer
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

capture

[′kap·chər]
(aerospace engineering)
The process in which a missile is taken under control by the guidance system.
(astrophysics)
Of a central force field, as of a planet, to overcome by gravitational force the velocity of a passing body and bring the body under the control of the central force field, in some cases absorbing its mass.
(geochemistry)
In a crystal structure, the substitution of a trace element for a lower-valence common element.
(hydrology)
The natural diversion of the headwaters of one stream into the channel of another stream having greater erosional activity and flowing at a lower level. Also known as piracy; river capture; river piracy; robbery; stream capture; stream piracy; stream robbery.
(physics)
A process in which an atomic or nuclear system acquires an additional particle; for example, the capture of electrons by positive ions, or capture of neutrons by nuclei.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

capture

i. In flying aircraft, to control aircraft trajectory to intercept and then follow an external radio beam (as in ILS, or instrument landing system).
ii. To detect and lock onto a target by a radar.
iii. In flying, to reach a desired altitude or direction, especially using an autopilot or automatic flight control system.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

capture

To acquire text, images, audio and video in their original format. Once captured in the computer, the data are typically edited and converted into another format. See frame grabber, video capture board and screen capture.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing upon the historical and theoretical insights of Part I, this Part evaluates how technological changes reshape contemporary capture theory. Using the key ideals of republicanism and republican moments that many still consider highly relevant and valuable today, this Article identifies, for the first time, two means by which social media communications can help correct the perceived failures of the administrative state.
II, The Capture Theory of Cosmical Evolution, a beautifully printed quarto of some 734 pages in which he sought to explain the intricacies of his cosmogony, or cosmology as we call it nowadays.
This of course, is no more than the sketchiest outline of his complicated and long discarded 'Capture Theory' of which his eloquent and imaginative 'impact theory' is a necessary corollary.
(176) The core conclusion from Capture Theory is that private organizations use legislators and agencies to create industry regulations that benefit a particular group's interest.
practice can be based upon capture theory, it must be because local legislative bodies, and subfederal judicial and regulatory institutions, are more susceptible to capture than a state legislature would be.
The codon capture theory is very appealing as it allows for the evolution of the code without the horrors of amino acid substitutions in a large number of proteins.
The literatures on rent seeking, the capture theory of regulation political entrepreneurship, and interest-group politics analyze how cronyism works, but because those literatures have developed relatively independently of one another, they have not been seen as components of a comprehensive theory of crony capitalism.
The 2002 Quality of Earnings Conference also produced findings consistent with capture theory. For example, Frankel, Johnson, and Nelson (2002) found that where auditors also received nonaudit fees, they were positively associated with small earnings surprises and the magnitude of discretionary accruals, while audit fees were negatively associated with those two indicators.
Hovenkamp shows, for example, how interest-group politics and the capture theory cannot explain railroad regulation.
One does not have to embrace the capture theory of regulation to see that public service liberalism gives firms great scope to set the public agenda.
A capture theory, which hypothesizes that the regulators actually serve the regulated industry, was proposed as early as 1936 in the political science literature, but was subsequently abandoned because numerous empirical examples were inconsistent with the theory.