capybara

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Related to Capybaras: Carpincho

capybara

(kăpĭbâr`ə), mammal of Central and much of South America. It is the largest living member of the order Rodentia (the rodents) reaching a length of 4 ft (120 cm) and a weight of 75 to 100 lb (34–45 kg). Its brownish hair flecked with yellow is coarse and scanty, and its tail rudimentary. The feet are partially webbed, and there are four thick-nailed toes on the front feet and three on the hind feet. The capybara is an expert swimmer and diver. It eats vegetation and sometimes damages crops. It is hunted for food, its hide is made into gloves, and its bristles are used in brushes. It is also called water hog and carpincho. Capybaras are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Rodentia, family Hydrochoeridae.
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capybara

[‚kap·ə′bar·ə]
(vertebrate zoology)
Hydrochoerus capybara. An aquatic rodent (largest rodent in existence) found in South America and characterized by partly webbed feet, no tail, and coarse hair.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

capybara

the largest rodent: a pig-sized amphibious hystricomorph, Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, resembling a guinea pig and inhabiting river banks in Central and South America: family Hydrochoeridae
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The capybara, renowned for its sociability, inhabits savannas and dense forests in South America in groups as large as 100, but hunting has reduced their numbers in some areas.
Foraging patterns of capybara in the seasonally flooded savanna of Venezuela.
In this paper, we present data on the prevalence and intensity of infection by Trypanosoma evansi in a population of capybaras and relate these variables to the physical state of the animals (using a condition index), their sex, and, in the case of females, their reproductive status (pregnant v.
Presence of wild reservoirs, such as capybaras and coatis, is frequently reported by locals from the properties visited during this study.
Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in a natural population of capybaras Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris in Esteros del Ibera (Argentina).
Capybaras weigh some 150 pounds and are native to the area.
Capybaras can stay underwater for up to five minutes, which allows them to hide from predators.
Which country is not home to either capybaras or squirrel monkeys?
FRIENDS OUR AT DUDLEY The paddock for the zoo's seven capybara - the world's largest rodent - and our three adorable Brazilian tapirs has been extended after Western greys Lou and Harold moved to a larger enclosure.
Bushmeat trade is generally local (traded in the village or in the closest town) and long distance trade routes within the country or to other countries are inexistent (except potentially the case of capybara meat exported illegally towards Venezuela).