Carpool

(redirected from Car-pooling)
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Carpool

An arrangement in which two or more people share a vehicle for transportation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The small amounts we save from car-pooling, home-packed lunches, hand-me-downs etc.
Hence we encourage parents to use school bus transport over car-pooling," he explained.
The app, which is designed to promote contact between drivers and other residents who may be interested in car-pooling, is currently available in Arabic and English, but will soon be available in Chinese, Tagalog and Urdu as well.
Rex Daryanani, spokesperson of the DLSZ Parents Association, told Manila Bulletin that while car-pooling is an option, they cannot force parents to agree to it and it can be cumbersome due to the different class schedules and extra-curricular activities that students take after classes.
Online search data shows the number of Welsh motorists sharing their cars, or "car-pooling", has rocketed by up to 710% over the past year.
M2 EQUITYBITES-September 15, 2011--Volvo IT adds car-pooling function to mobile service(C)2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
NORDIC BUSINESS REPORT-September 15, 2011--Volvo IT adds car-pooling function to mobile service(C)2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
23 December 2010 - France's leading car-pooling website, covoiturage.fr, has published 420,000 offers for the Christmas holidays.
The hike is intended to encourage car-pooling and bus travel.
The carbon footprint is likely to fall even lower, with green options currently being assessed including car-pooling for officials, replacing battery-powered torches with wind-up ones and recycling.
The carbon footprint is likely to get even lower, with green options currently being assessed include car-pooling for officials, replacing battery-powered torches with wind-up ones and recycling.
"If they think this is permanent, they'll eventually buy smaller cars, start car-pooling, all those kinds of things," said University of Oregon economist Mark Thoma.