carburetor icing

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carburetor icing

[′kär·bə‚red·ər ‚ī·siŋ]
(mechanical engineering)
The formation of ice in an engine carburetor as a consequence of expansive cooling and evaporation of gasoline.

carburetor icing

carburetor icingclick for a larger image
The most common form of engine icing, which is caused by a sudden drop in temperature resulting from vaporization of the fuel and adiabatic cooling following the pressure reduction as the air accelerates through the venturi of the carburetor. The ice gradually builds up and blocks the venturi, upsetting the fuel-air mixture and resulting in a loss of power.
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References in periodicals archive ?
is grounds to both suspect and prevent carb icing as a normal operating practice.
Some engine/airframe combinations are more prone to carb icing, and others require carburetor heat to be applied below a specified rpm while the same basic engine in another air-frame has no such limitation.
Including carb icing, all six hazards are especially dangerous to instrument pilots flying on an IFR clearance.