carbon fixation

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carbon fixation

[′kär·bən fik¦sā·shən]
(cell and molecular biology)
During photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert carbon dioxide from the air into organic molecules.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A critical review on the improvement of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C3 plants using genetic engineering.
We measured the carbon assimilation uptake at several irradiances ranging from 1 500 to 0 [micro]mol/[m.sup.2]s by pre-illuminating leaves at 1 250 [micro]mol/mV for 2-3 min.
Where A is the net carbon assimilation rate; CE is the carboxylation efficiency, which was determined from the initial slope of the A/Ci response curve (Ci less than 200 mol mol); Ci is the leaf internal CO2 concentration; Amax is the maximum net carbon assimilation rate at saturating CO2; and Rd is the day respiration.
The daytime carbon assimilation rates of mangrove forests at the two eddy tower sites reached about 10 to 20 [micro]mol x [m.sup.-2] [s.sup.-1] throughout the whole year with only a small increase in the mid-time of the year (May to October), while the nighttime ecosystem respiration rate increased on summer days between June and August and was higher than 4 [micro]mol x [m.sup.-2] [s.sup.-1] at both sites (Figure 4).
Effects of water deficits on carbon assimilation. Journal of Experimental Botany, 42: 1-16.
2007 Study the characteristics of carbon assimilation by Bamboo (phyllostachy Pubescens) plant in Tianmu Mountain.
When phosphate limitation was accompanied by a N:P ratio between 5-10, there was a better carbon assimilation and a higher IA concentration was obtained.
Over winter wheat canopy, the carbon assimilation values ranged from a maximum of -14.5 [micro]mol [m.sup.-2] [s.sup.-1] (11:00 - 12:00 local time) in March, to a minimum of about - 5 [micro]mol [m.sup.-2] [s.sup.-1] in January.
At the present time five different autotrophic pathways have been described (Thauer, 2007; Nakagawa and Takai, 2008) and we chose these for comparison, all having been well established for carbon assimilation: (i) the reductive pentose phosphate pathway (Calvin and Bassham, 1962), (ii) the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle (Buchanan and Arnon, 1990), (iii) the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway (Ljungdahl, 1986), and (iv) the 3-hydroxypropianate cycle (Ishii et al., 2004) and (v) its variant the 4-hydroxy butyrate cycle (Berg et al, 2007).
GLcB is an enzyme that catalyses carbon assimilation by the glyoxylate shunt pathway [6] and seems to be involved in M.tuberculosis virulence [7].