Carbon sink


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carbon sink

[′kär·bən ‚siŋk]
(geochemistry)
A reservoir that absorbs or takes up atmospheric carbon; for example, a forest or an ocean.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Carbon sink

The carbon reservoirs and conditions that take in and store more carbon (i.e., carbon sequestration) than they release.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
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In 2013 to 2014, ERDB assessed the carbon sink potential of bamboos for mitigating the effects of climate change.
'The carbon sink reserve should serve as a model to other private land owners on how to restore selected parts of their lands to strengthen the balance between forest and non-forest use,' Granert said.
And early research shows it could have an impact on the oceanic carbon sink. There's increasing evidence, the CIEL researchers found, of microplastic being consumed by plankton.
Largescale reforestation programmes in China are also making a major contribution to this carbon sink.
In particular they'll look at the exchange process called flux and gather information to help improve computer models of carbon sinks.
Over time, this process creates a high level of peata accumulated dead vegetation that acts as a huge carbon sink, absorbing carbon from the atmosphere.
For this reason, large forested areas of the Earth, such as the Amazon basin, are important "carbon sinks".
The researchers found that yearly variations in the carbon sink strongly correlated with variations in plant respiration.
Relatively young carbon isn't definitive proof that desert irrigation is a carbon sink, says biogeochemist Akihiro Koyama of Algoma University in Sault Ste.
said the carbon sink project is a critical component in order for the firm to succeed.
The green belt in England helps to preserve the natural environment and provides a haven for wildlife and a carbon sink.
In addition, it will take decades for newly planted trees to mature, replace the felled trees, and once again act as a carbon sink. In the meantime, burning the timber will release large quantities of stored carbon into the atmosphere.