carbon-14


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carbon-14

[′kär·bən ′fȯr‚tēn]
(nuclear physics)
A naturally occurring radioisotope of carbon having a mass number of 14 and half-life of 5780 years; used in radiocarbon dating and in the elucidation of the metabolic path of carbon in photosynthesis. Also known as radiocarbon.
References in periodicals archive ?
But after an organism dies, the radiocarbon clock starts ticking as carbon-14 steadily dwindles in comparison with stable carbon-12.
However, rhus physicists can actively use the 'imprint' of the bomb pulse to study the carbon-14 content of materials.
This variation is reflected in all human tissue, because humans eat plants (and animals fed on plants) that take up carbon-14 from the atmosphere.
The scientists found that levels of carbon-14 in the two cedars were about 1.
11 Science, Teuten and her colleagues report finding plenty of carbon-14 in the blubber-derived MeO-PBDEs.
Guilderson could use the carbon-14 in the cores as a tracer to determine not only when the large CO2 release occurred but the ocean pathway by which it escaped.
Until the late 1940's all carbon-14 in the Earth's biosphere was produced by the interaction between cosmic rays and nitrogen in the upper atmosphere," Jones said.
Goodman to date the underwater layers using two methods: carbon-14 dating and OSL (optically stimulated luminescence).
At three sites in Venice, and on two nearby islands, they used carbon-14 techniques to date buried structures.
By measuring the amount of carbon-14 isotopes in methane from air bubbles trapped in glacial ice, the researchers determined that the surge that took place nearly 12,000 years ago was more chemically consistent with an expansion of wetlands.
The core has hundreds of light and dark bands, which the team dated using carbon-14 analysis.
For the study, Orjan Gustafsson, from Stockholm University in Sweden, and colleagues measured the proportion of an isotope called carbon-14, or radiocarbon, in soot particles collected from a mountaintop site at Sinhagad, India, and from the Maldives in the Indian Ocean.