carbonation

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carbonation

[‚kär·bə′nā·shən]
(chemistry)
Conversion to a carbonate.
(chemical engineering)
The process by which a fluid, especially a beverage, is impregnated with carbon dioxide.
(geochemistry)
A process of chemical weathering whereby minerals that contain soda, lime, potash, or basic oxides are changed to carbonates by the carbonic acid in air or water.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

carbonation

The reaction between carbon dioxide and calcium compounds, esp. in cement paste, mortar, or concrete, to produce calcium carbonate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Study the effects of different carbonated drinks on the labial surface of enamel and its esthetic outcomes.
The knowledge of participant regarding caloric value and ill effects of carbonated drink were also not satisfactory.
The findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, showed that people who drink colas and other caffeinated, carbonated drinks, tended to excrete vital calcium through their urine.
He said that the carbonated drinks market in Turkey has matured but in Pakistan there is a lot of room to be covered.
He said that teams had caught them red-handed making fake carbonated drinks of different brands with artificial flavours, hazardous chemicals and contaminated water.
Effective from Saturday, June 15, the sultanate will join the list of other GCC states in levying 100 per cent tax on alcohol, tobacco, energy drinks, pork meat and 50 per cent on carbonated drinks.
According the source the cabinet approved Rs10 health tax on tobacco per packet of 20 cigarettes and Rs1 on 250 ML bottle carbonated drink through finance bill 2019-20.
beverage giant's first hot carbonated drink anywhere in the world, with Japan's Kirin Beverage Co.
Indeed, in the U.S., some 16% of new carbonated drink launches carried a no additives or preservatives claim (up from 12.5% in 2006)--and in the U.K., a massive 37% of new carbonated drink launches carried this claim--up from 14% in 2006.
The study of more than 2,500 people found that those who consumed diet drinks every day had a 61% higher chance of experiencing vascular problems than those who did not have any kind of carbonated drink.