Carburizing Steel

Carburizing Steel

 

structural steel with a low carbon content (usually 0.1–0.25 percent), used to manufacture parts that are to be carburized. Carbon steels are used for small parts that must withstand wear but that need not have a high core strength; alloy steels are used for very large and heavily loaded parts. In some cases, as in the manufacture of gear wheels that are to be carburized or carbonitrided, the carbon content of the steel is increased to 0.25–0.3 percent, which increases the core strength and makes it possible to decrease the depth of case hardening, thus decreasing the time required for treatment.

References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the optimal NbC solubility product in Nb-added carburizing steel was examined.
In order to ensure hardness after carburizing, hardenability is required in carburizing steel. Figure 8 shows the effects of Si, Mn and Cr on the hardenability index [beta] value.
A new carburizing steel was developed by integrating several metallurgical technologies, making it possible to omit annealing before cold forging and normalizing before carburizing simultaneously.
The second work measures the precipitation of Copper in 18CrNiMo7-6 martensitic carburizing steel. Similar to the Cu-alloying concept in HSLA steels, Copper of 1.0% and 1.5% mass was added to investigate the improvement of rolling contact fatigue in gear steel by nanosized precipitate which enhances the strain hardening behavior [8].
In the past, lots of carburizing steels were usually used to manufacture the aviation parts, such as 12CrNi3A, 14CrMnSiNi2MoA, 18Cr2Ni4WA, and 20CrNi3A.
Therefore, the low friction and wear resistance for the carburizing steels of drive elements (such as SCM415) with nitride treatment are further investigated.