Cardillac


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Cardillac

goldsmith who murders to regain what he created. [Ger. Opera: Hindemith, Cardillac, Westerman, 487]
References in classic literature ?
Macaire, Cardillac, Ryons, and all the cluster of flourishing towns which look upon Bordeaux as their mother, there thronged an unceasing stream of horsemen and of footmen, all converging upon the great city.
All but the 1940s are marked by major stage works: Cardillac (1925-26), Neues vom Tage (1928-29), Mathis der Maler (1933-35), and Die Harmonie der Welt (1951, 1956-57).
And so this year the Opera of the National Moravian-Silesian Theatre presented Hindemith's Cardillac (for the first time ever in Ostrava and the first Czech staging for 84 years) and for 2012 is preparing Stravinsky's The Rake's Progress.
The score combines jagged harmonies and melodies with baroque musical forms as it tells the story of the lonely, embittered master goldsmith Cardillac who loves his jewelry more than people, including his own daughter.
Camilla Bork looks at a scene in the first act of Paul Hindemith's Cardillac as an example of a "love discourse" under the auspices of the "Neue Sachlichkeit.
In Hoffmann's Mademoiselle de Scudery, Cardillac, a revered artisan by day, becomes a murderer by night.