Caribbean Current


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Caribbean Current

[kar·ə′bē·ən ′kər·ənt]
(oceanography)
A water current flowing westward through the Caribbean Sea.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Caribbean Current

 

a current in the Caribbean Sea, anextension of the North Equatorial Current of the AtlanticOcean. It flows to the west and northwest along the Great An-tilles Islands and then south at speeds of 1–2.8 km/hr andhigher. The water temperature is 25°-28°C; salinity is approxi-mately 36.0 parts per thousand.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The westward-flowing Caribbean Current (Wust, 1964; Morrison & Nowlin, 1982), with its characteristically intense transit of mesoscale eddies, is the major oceanographic process in the Caribbean (Jouanno, Sheinbaum, Barnier, Molines, & Candela, 2012).
In the Northeast zone, eddies are formed and transported in both seasons in the Caribbean current that enters the Colombia basin from Brazil.
"These reports indicate that the large amount of sargassum-and presumably the dolphin associating with it--in the Caribbean is being pushed to the west where the Caribbean current should carry it northward ultimately through the Yucatan Straits into the Gulf of Mexico," he said.
Two of these sites are within the "northern Caribbean current track": San Salvador (Bahamas) and St.
1), a larva traveling in the major Caribbean currents would be carried at least 360 km.
The water advected northward by the eddies probably then enters the Caribbean Current.
They then ride the Antilles, Florida and Caribbean currents and the Gulf Stream for about a year if they are American eels.
As stated in the preface by Peter Manuel, Caribbean Currents is intended as an introductory text, primarily for undergraduate college students.
Caribbean Currents is organized into ten chapters, each of which constitutes a separate study that may be read independency of other sections.
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