Sagan, Carl Edward

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Sagan, Carl Edward

(sā`gən), 1934–96, American astronomer and popularizer of science, b. New York City. Early in his career he investigated radio emissions from Venus and concluded that the cause was a surface temperature of c.900°F; (500°C;) and crushing atmospheric pressure. He also studied color variations on Mars' surface, concluding that they were not seasonal changes as most believed but shifts in surface dust caused by windstorms. Both conclusions were substantially confirmed years later by space probes. Sagan is best known, however, for his research on the possibilities of extraterrestrial life (see exobiologyexobiology
or astrobiology,
search for extraterrestrial life within the solar system and throughout the universe. Philosophical speculation that there might be other worlds similar to ours dates back to the ancient Chinese and Greeks.
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), including experimental demonstration of the production of amino acids from basic chemicals by radiation. A professor of astronomy and space sciences at Cornell after 1968, he was involved with numerous NASA planetary space probes and was the creator and host of the 1980 public television science series Cosmos. His publications include The Dragons of Eden (1977; Pulitzer Prize); a novel, Contact (1985); with Richard Turco, A Path Where No Man Thought (1990), on nuclear winternuclear winter,
theory holding that the smoke and dust produced by a large nuclear war would result in a prolonged period of cold on the earth. The earliest version of the theory, which was put forward in the early 1980s in the so-called TTAPS report (named for last initials of
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; with Ann Druyan, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (1992); Pale Blue Dot (1994); and The Demon-Haunted World (1995).

Bibliography

See biographies by K. Davidson (1999) and W. Poundstone (1999).

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Sagan, Carl Edward

(1934–  ) astronomer, author; born in New York City. He began teaching at Harvard University (1962–68) while also working as an astrophysicist at the Smithsonian Observatory (1962–68). At Cornell University from 1970, his enthusiasm for space science and the possibility of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe stimulated the public's interest through such works as the television series Cosmos (1977) and books like the Cosmic Connection (1973) and (with Ann Druyen), Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (1992).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just imagine an alien world glowing softly in a powerful telescope," said lead author Jack O'Malley-James, a researcher at Cornell's Carl Sagan Institute.
The vocals are from the maestro Carl Sagan, who is my inspiration, even when it comes to producing electronic music."
The idea behind the (https://www.ibtimes.com/spacecraft-will-sail-sunlight-launch-month-2797496) LightSail2 was first conceptualized by The Planetary Society's founder Carl Sagan before his death in 1996.
Synopsis: In 1977, a team led by the great Carl Sagan was put together to create a record that would travel to the stars on the back of NASA's Voyager probe.
The show is a follow-up to the renowned 1980 series "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage," which was presented by the late Carl Sagan. The 2014 version follows a very similar structure, but has been updated to include new information and discoveries made in the 34 years since its predecessor debuted, along with the latest production techniques and much better narration.
Now with "Carl Went To The Library: The Inspiration of a Young Carl Sagan", children ages 1-8 can blast off with Carl as he embarks on a curious journey of adventure in order to find the answer to a question that no one seems to be able to give him an answer to.
Astrophysicist Carl Sagan is famously quoted often, saying, 'The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars.
Gleick has won the 2018 Carl Sagan Prize for Science Popularization.
Sisson has illustrated over 60 children's books and is the author and illustrator of Star Stuff, a biography of cosmologist Carl Sagan.
Wells, Percival Lowell, Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray, and many others--and what Grinspoon calls their "brilliant mistakes." But let's continue with both science and imagination.