Carmelite


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Related to Carmelite: Carmelite order, Carmelite nuns

Carmelite

RC Church
1. a member of an order of mendicant friars founded about 1154; a White Friar
2. a member of a corresponding order of nuns founded in 1452, noted for its austere rule
References in periodicals archive ?
Aside from an increase in vocations, the Carmelites also hope to bring the congregation to Chinese shores.
Historians explore the history of the Carmelite Order during the Middle Ages, focusing on its struggle to find an identity either as an eremetical organization or a mendicant order.
Carmelite convent, Known as the sacred heart, Destroyed by a fire in march 2006.
Part of the Carmelite Monastery site has been refurbished to provide vital services and support for terminally ill children and their families.
Throwback Thursday: A cover story I was assigned to do in 1986 as a staff writer of the Sunday Inquirer Magazine was about the kidnapping of 10 contemplative Carmelite nuns in Marawi City.
To understand what brought Carmelite Sisters of Mary Leslie Lund and Nancy Casale to seek holiness as hermits in the northwestern wilderness of Washington a quarter-century ago, it's helpful to take the long view --800 years of long view.
Hardy (a professor of Christian Spirituality who lectures at retreats and conferences, along with conducting workshops on Carmelite Spirituality focusing especially on St.
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, OCD (12 October 1891-9 August 1942), was a German Jewish philosopher who converted to the Roman Catholic Church and became a Discalced Carmelite nun.
Nicky Hallett's work has played no small part in this shift as she has immersed herself in the lives of early modern English Catholic nuns who left their Protestant homeland to become nuns in Carmelite convents in northern Europe (especially Antwerp).
Hallett does an excellent job of presenting a unique and under-studied set of archival materials, that of the English Discalced Carmelite communities of Lierre and Antwerp.
Moreover the work provides detailed information about missionary strategies, as a letter of 1665 from a Persian Carmelite to the general of the order in Rome makes clear: "To confound Persian temerity accomplished persons are needed, for these people are very studious--they have infinite esteem for a Religious who can stand up to them (in argument)" (1:448).
In the second article, Saverio Sturm focuses on the architectural patronage of the Carmelite order, in particular the Discalced branch, which originated in sixteenth-century Spain under the guidance of Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross.