Carmelites

(redirected from Carmelite nuns)

Carmelites

(kär`məlīts), Roman Catholic order of mendicant friars. Originally a group of hermits, apparently European, living on Mt. Carmel in Palestine, their supervision was undertaken (c.1150) by St. Berthold. In 1238 they moved to Cyprus, and thence to Western Europe. St. Simon Stock (d. 1265), an Englishman, was their second founder. He transformed them into an order of friars resembling Dominicans and Franciscans and founded monasteries at Oxford, Cambridge, Paris, and Bologna. They rapidly became prominent in university life. An enclosed order of Carmelite nuns was established. The Carmelites, like other orders, declined in the 15th cent. They were revived by St. TheresaTheresa or Teresa, Saint
(Theresa of Ávila) , 1515–82, Spanish Carmelite nun, Doctor of the Church, one of the principal saints of the Roman Catholic Church, one of the greatest mystics, and a leading
..... Click the link for more information.
 (of Ávila) and St. John of the CrossJohn of the Cross, Saint,
Span. Juan de la Cruz, 1542–91, Spanish mystic and poet, Doctor of the Church. His name was originally Juan de Yepes. He was a founder of the Discalced Carmelites and a close friend of St.
..... Click the link for more information.
 in 16th-century Spain. These great contemplatives gave the order a special orientation toward mysticism. Their reformed branch is the Discalced (or Barefoot) Carmelites; it is now more numerous than the Carmelites of the Old Observance. The Discalced Carmelites cultivate the contemplative life in all aspects, and they have produced many works on mystical theology. St. TheresaTheresa or Thérèse, Saint
(Theresa of Lisieux), 1873–97, French Carmelite nun, one of the most widely loved saints of the Roman Catholic Church, b. Alençon.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (of Lisieux) is a well-known Discalced Carmelite of the 19th cent. In 1790 the first community came to the United States and settled near Port Tobacco, Md. There are presently about 6,900 priests and brothers living in Carmelite communities, with 500 living in the United States.

Bibliography

See E. A. Peers, Spirit of Flame (1944, repr. 1961); P. Rohrback, Journey to the Carith (1966).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Carmelites

 

members of a Catholic mendicant monastic order, founded in the second half of the 12th century in Palestine by the Italian crusader Berthold.

The Carmelites’ first monastic community was located on Mount Carmel (hence the name). Their rule was approved byPope Honorius III in 1226. After the failure of the Crusades, theCarmelites moved to Western Europe (13th century), whereunder Pope Innocent IV they were turned into a mendicantorder in 1245 or 1247. In the 16th century the order was againreformed, after which it split into two branches (the Carmelitesand the Discalced, or Barefoot, Carmelites). In 1972 the ordernumbered about 8, 000 monks; the women’s order of Carmelites(established in the 15th century) numbered more than 12, 000nuns.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
'In plain words,' he said, 'the priest of the Catholic chapel close by has converted her; and she is now a novice in a convent of Carmelite nuns in the West of England.
You and your poor aunt are worse off than Carmelite nuns in their cells.
Oh yes, I still remember the time I requested her to donate new habits for the Carmelite nuns. Tita Daisy didn't loose time in soliciting funds from us her friends, took the nuns' measurements, bought the needed materials, and, with the help of her students in her sewing classes, presented the grateful and happy Carmelite nuns with their new habits.
Chin Chin Gutierrez, at 50 years-old, now responds to the name Sister Lourdes Gutierrez of the Order of the Carmelite Nuns.
Father Romel Rubio OAR told the Manila Bulletin in an interview a few hours before the arrival of the Black Nazarene, that the image of the Our Lady of Mount Carmel was a gift of the Carmelite nuns of Mexico to the Augustinian Recollect priests that arrived in the Philippines in 1618.
My dear wife asked for prayers, begging for a miracle, mainly from Carmelite nuns in the Lipa City shrine of the Blessed Virgin Mary Mediatrix of All Grace.
They passed by Acapulco, Mexico where the image of Nuestra Senora del Carmen (Our Lady of Mount Carmel) was given by the Discalced Carmelite nuns as a gift.
And a community of 16 Carmelite nuns in the Hondarribia monastery in the Basque country condemned the court ruling on Facebook.
Set in 1794, the opera tells the story of the Carmelite nuns who refused to renounce their vocation and were subsequently guillotined.
Whether woodcut-printing the text piece I want to let the work fall down, 2005; inviting cloistered Carmelite nuns to film their homespun creative activity (Little Works, 2007); illustrating a 2014 edition of Kant's Critique of Judgment with sublunary, seemingly chance-determined images that cause adjudication to misfire; or repeatedly confessing her artistic influences, Buttner skews from ego.
Though both spent many years of devotion residing in communal monasteries with other Carmelite nuns, it was their desire to live more fully the spirituality of the monks of Mount Carmel that led them into the wilderness, to seek "the original charism," that of the first Carmelite hermits.
In lieu of flowers, remembrances to Carmelite Nuns in Eugene.