Carnegie Mellon University

(redirected from Carnegie-Mellon University)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Carnegie-Mellon University: Case Western Reserve University

Carnegie Mellon University,

at Pittsburgh, Pa.; est. 1967 through the merger of the Carnegie Institute of Technology (founded 1900, opened 1905) and the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research (founded 1913). Carnegie Mellon, which also has campuses at Moffett Field, Calif., Doha, Qatar, and Kigali, Rwanda, has seven schools and colleges and more than 110 research institutes and centers. The university was the first in the United States to offer academic degrees in the field of drama.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Carnegie Mellon University

(body, education)
(CMU) A university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. School of Computer Science.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Missing from the competition was Hitech, the 1985 champion developed by Hans Berliner of Carnegie-Mellon University (SN: 10/26/85, p.260).
Now, researchers at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh have designed and built a kind of Manute Bol of robots--a tall, slender machine poised precariously on a roller-skate base.
That is what researchers at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh set out to discover with computerized Monte Carlo simulations of a shaken can containing large and small balls.
The program swept through its next two games and seemed ready for its climactic match with favored Hitech, developed by Hans Berliner and his colleagues at Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU) in Pittsburgh.
The winners of the competition, which attracted 102 proposals from 75 institutions, are Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh (improved product design methods), the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (microelectronics and compound semiconductors), Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa.
Raibert of Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh.
Humphrey of Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh proposes using characteristics of the walls between bubbles as memory units.