Carnot efficiency


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Carnot efficiency

[kär′nō i′fish·ən·sē]
(thermodynamics)
The efficiency of a Carnot engine receiving heat at a temperature absolute T1 and giving it up at a lower temperature absolute T2; equal to (T1-T2)/ T1.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In these two time-dependent diagrams it is also obvious that the engine cannot generate any power when operated at Carnot efficiency.
The black solid circles in the lower graphs indicate the instantaneous time, the blue dashed line in the lower right graph indicates the Carnot efficiency, and the red dashed line indicates the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency.
(1) Why do most power plants and engines have an efficiency that is so far from the Carnot efficiency? After all students had written their answers, the papers were collected and the visualization tool was demonstrated.
Following the demonstration, we again looked at the power plant data and we explained to the students that the observed efficiencies match very well the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiencies and that no power plant will operate at the Carnot efficiency since the output power in this case will approach zero.
Many of these students appear to believe that the reason that real power plants do not operate at Carnot efficiency is that the Carnot process is ideal and thus not possible to reach in practice, because of heat losses.
They seem to understand that Carnot efficiency can in principle be reached, but that it would require a very long cycle time and a minimum of heat losses, which is not practically feasible.
This student knows that there is a timing issue but somehow misunderstands and believes that the time in the isotherms should approach zero instead of infinity in order to reach Carnot efficiency.
These MHD generators have a carnot efficiency of around 85 percent, which is much better than steam turbines.
Carnot efficiency was calculated using a cold source temperature of 120[degrees]F (49[degrees]C) and a heat source temperature either equal to the exhaust gas temperature or limited at some lower temperature to avoid working fluid decomposition.
We know, for example, that the energy-conversion efficiency of a thermal power plant (Figure 1) cannot exceed the Carnot efficiency (1 - T.sub.0./T.sub.H.).