Carnuntum


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Carnuntum

 

an ancient Celtic habitation site on the right bank of the Danube, near Hainburg, Austria. Under the emperor Augustus, Carnuntum was used as a camp during the war with Maroboduus (a.d. 6). Later, it acquired the significance of an important fortification on the Danube frontier of the Roman Empire. In 73 it was enclosed with a stone wall and became an outpost for Roman legions. During the Roman wars with the frontier tribes, Carnuntum was destroyed and then reconstructed several times (the last time in 375); it was razed once and for all circa 400. The site was excavated in the 1920’s and 1930’s. Two amphitheaters, a praetorium, a forum, thermae, a mithraeum, and other buildings were discovered.

REFERENCES

Swoboda, E. Carnuntum, 2nd ed. Vienna, 1953.
Schober, A. Römerzeit in Österreich [2nd ed.]. Vienna, 1955.
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Advanced imaging techniques led to the discovery of a training center for these warrior-entertainers at Carnuntum, a Roman city excavated on and off since the late 19th century.
The buried remnants of the school at the Carnuntum, close to Vienna, were detected through remote-sensing techniques and not through manual excavations.
The four sites are: Carnuntum Archaeological Park, a reconstructed Roman city quarter in Bad Deutsch-Altenburg, Austria; the medieval Great Guild Hall in Tallinn, Estonia; the 100-year-old Peace Palace in The Hague; and Camp Westerbork, a World War Two Nazi transit camp at Hooghalen, also in the Netherlands.
Internationalen Limeskongrejles 1986 in Carnuntum, 67-70.
The Carnuntum ruins are part of a city of 50,000 people 28 miles (45 kilometers) east of Vienna that flourished about 1,700 years ago, a major military and trade outpost linking the far-flung Roman empire's Asian boundaries to its central and northern European lands.