common carotid artery

(redirected from Carotid arteries)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Carotid arteries: Jugular veins

common carotid artery

[¦käm·ən kə′räd·əd ′ärd·ə·rē]
(anatomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
The landmarks in zone 1 start from the clavicles and sternal notch to the cricoid cartilage and house vital structures like the aortic arch, proximal carotid arteries, vertebral arteries, subclavian vessels, innominate vessels, lung apices, esophagus, trachea, brachial plexus, and thoracic duct.
Three-dimensional structures of left and right carotid arteries are reconstructed from stack of tomographic images (Somatom Definition AS 64 slices CT) of a patient suffering from carotid atherosclerosis at Sri Aurobindo Institute of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Indore, India.
The optimal treatment choice remains complex and debatable, in particular when these lesions are associated with the most common anatomical variant of the aortic arch branching, the so-called "bovine arch." The more usual subtype is described as the common origin of the brachiocephalic and left common carotid arteries and can occur in as many as 20% of patients [5, 6].
The common carotid arteries and the subclavian artery supply the head, the cervical and pectoral regions, and the wings.
FMD accounts for 15% of all cervical artery dissections.[sup][4],[5] Renal and carotid arteries are most commonly affected, yet dissections can be seen in any vascular extension.[sup][5]
Everyone in the HIV-positive and negative groups had cardiovascular magnetic resonance to create three-dimensional images of the common carotid arteries 40 mm (1.6 inches) long.
Atherosclerotic plaques and stenosis can be detected by noninvasive ultrasound imaging of the carotid arteries which has high sensitivity and specificity in detecting carotid artery stenosis.
The artery is divided into internal and external carotid arteries at the upper rim of the thyroid cartilage.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently cleared for marketing the Enroute Transcarotid Neuroprotection System (Enroute TPS), for use during a minimally invasive procedure to restore normal blood flow to narrowed carotid arteries. It is the first device designed to access the carotid arteries through an incision in the neck, instead of the groin, and uses a blood flow reversal system to capture pieces of the blockage dislodged during the procedure.

Full browser ?