carpel

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carpel

the female reproductive organ of flowering plants, consisting of an ovary, style (sometimes absent), and stigma. The carpels are separate or fused to form a single pistil

Carpel

 

the organ on which the ovules develop in the flower of angiospermous plants. The pistil is formed from one or more carpels; the aggregate of carpels is called the gynoecium. The carpel is considered an organ of leaf origin, homologous, however, not to the leaf but to the megasporophyll.

carpel

[′kär·pəl]
(botany)
The basic specialized leaf of the female reproductive structure in angiosperms; a megasporophyll.
References in periodicals archive ?
The flower is bisexual and has three stamen and carpel have three branched stigma.
The total fusion of carpels until the middle of the ovary length (synascidiate), the partial division on the upper side and on the style (symplicate) and the trifid stigma were characteristics observed in this study for both species and described for all the studied species by Weckerle and Rutishauser (2005).
In Erythroxylaceae and some Linaceae only one of the three carpels is fertile, which makes the flowers monosymmetric by reduction (Matthews & Endress, 2011).
The fruit presents two dehiscence regions: dorsal dehiscence (Figuras 3A and B; 5A and B), and other one that occurs along the carpel sutures (Figuras 3A, 4B and 5A).
Two hundred years later the notion that sepals, petals, stamens and carpels are all modified leaves got its molecular validation.
Those containing only stamens are logically called staminate flowers, and those lacking stamens but having carpels are termed either pistillate or carpellate.
One carpel was detached from each capsule and the seed removed.
When fitting the model, I included the total number of carpels initially produced by the plant (summed over all its flowers) as a covariate to account for differences between plants in their inherent potential for seed production.
A pistil may consist of a single carpel or of two or more carpels partly or completely joined together, enclosing the ovules.
They developed before the advent of bees and produce no nectar but attract their pollinators - beetles - with sweetly scented sugary secretions~*~ Their coloured "petals" are not Magnolia petals at all but carpels thick enough stellata is a to dissuade pollinating beetles from spectacular tucking in.
In all four genera of Dasypogonaceae, flowers are trimerous and pentacyclic, with six tepals in two alternating whorls, six stamens in two alternating whorls and a central gynoecium that is normally composed of three fused carpels located in the same floral sectors as the outer stamens and outer tepals.