carrageenan

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carrageenan

[‚kar·ə′gē·nən]
(organic chemistry)
A polysaccharide derived from the red seaweed (Rhodophyceae) and used chiefly as an emulsifying, gelling, and stabilizing agent and as a viscosity builder in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Also spelled carrageenin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, the greater magnitude of elongation at break is characterized by gelatin capsule shells in comparison with capsule shells based on carrageenan.
It has been shown that the higher magnitude of load at break and elongation at break are characterized by gelatin capsule shells as compared with capsule shells based on carrageenan.
Traditionally refined carrageenan is produced by extracting it from the seaweed and filtering the extract to remove cellulose and other substances.
Joanne Tobacman, a researcher at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, published a safety review of carrageenan in Environmental Heath Perspectives.
New production technologies recently developed by Cargill not only allow the company to use alternative and more secure raw material sources for its carrageenans, but also enable improved functionality of the seaweed extracts.
Fitting the Response Surface Models The effect of three independent variables, CMC-Na content, xanthan gum content and carrageenan content, on two response variables (viscosity and cloudiness) was evaluated by using the response surface methodology (RSM).
Colorimetric determination of carrageenans and other anionic hydrocolloids with methylene blue, Analytical chemistry, 66: 4514 - 4521.
A novel biopolymer-based superabsorbent hydrogel,kC-g-poly(AA-co-NIPAM)was used Hydrogel was synthesized through simultaneous crosslinking and graft polymerization of acrylic acid/N-isopropylacrylamide mixtures onto kappa- carrageenan.
In rodent models, there is clear evidence that degraded carrageenan can induce ulcerations and neoplasms.
Twenty-five percent of total carrageenans in eight food-grade carrageenans were found to have molecular weight < 100,000, with 9% having molecular weight < 50,000 (9).
Previously, the JECFA considered modification of their recommendation about carrageenan to include a minimum average molecular weight (3,4).