Cartesian axis

Cartesian axis

[kär′tē·zhən ′ak·səs]
(mathematics)
One of a set of mutually perpendicular lines which all pass through a single point, used to define a cartesian coordinate system; the value of one of the coordinates on the axis is equal to the directed distance from the intersection of axes, while the values of the other coordinates vanish.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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4) is taken when the thermal camera is situated right perpendicular to the patient while the ensemble is moving on the horizontal Cartesian axis. The use of the circular mark is beneficial for two reasons in this case.
Each robot moves independently on its own Cartesian axis X-Y-Z and T, with rotation of the tube gripper on the Z-axis.
The first Cartesian axis of the schematic face-differentiation space is interpreted in these studies as the mechanism to detect mouth curvature.
While changing the tool orientation, contour violation is avoided, as TRAORI enables compensation movements of the involved cartesian axis. Furthermore, far less data need to be transferred from the upstream PP, due to the fact that the tool orientation is described by means of a start and end vector of the programmed tool path and all intermediate points are calculated within the CNC controller.