Cartesian

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Cartesian

1. of or relating to the works of René Descartes (1596--1650), the French philosopher and mathematician
2. of, relating to, or used in Descartes' mathematical system
3. of, relating to, or derived from Descartes' philosophy, esp his contentions that personal identity consists in the continued existence of a unique mind and that the mind and body are connected causally
References in periodicals archive ?
There is not enough space to reproduce Nadler's subtle analysis here; this chapter does one of the most thorough jobs of contrasting the various flavors of occasionalism among the Cartesians.
The Cartesian view of the mind, I shall argue, mistakenly elevates reason, or conscious thought, at the expense of perception and simple acts of bodily movement.
Despite the apparent success of van t'Hoff's view of "atoms arranged in space," almost 150 years later we are still using the more rectangular Cartesian coordinates to describe organic chemistry molecules.
It is relation to such writers as the radical Cartesian and popular theologian Adriaan Koerbagh that van Bunge discusses the development of Spinozism.
There is, then, no consensus among the Cartesians on the role that representation plays in the life of the mind.
Two, they show that as Cartesian thinking was both inspired and constrained by Christian theology, critiques of Descartes and Mind-Body dualism cannot ignore religious issues.
In 'Descartes and the Internal Senses: On Memory and Remembrance', Lucian Petrescu aims to remedy the relative neglect in Cartesian scholarship of Descartes' physiological writings by comparison with his metaphysical and physical works.
Cartesian Nightmare: An Introduction to Transcendental Sophistry.
Focusing on this dispute between the Cartesians and the Gassendists, Lennon is arguing for a major reinterpretation of early modern philosophy.
Hence, Cartesian dualism was by no means a desperate rearguard action against the scientific revolution; on the contrary, it was the logical outcome of the scientific revolution.
Yet there is one Cartesian for whom the "traditional" reading is largely on the mark.
This book is a sustained argument against a philosophical mistake that is a mistake because it is Cartesian. Yet, finally, Rockwell argues for his own ontology on the basis that it contains concepts that are, in comparison to others, clear and distinct.