Cartesian

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Cartesian

1. of or relating to the works of René Descartes (1596--1650), the French philosopher and mathematician
2. of, relating to, or used in Descartes' mathematical system
3. of, relating to, or derived from Descartes' philosophy, esp his contentions that personal identity consists in the continued existence of a unique mind and that the mind and body are connected causally
References in periodicals archive ?
There is not enough space to reproduce Nadler's subtle analysis here; this chapter does one of the most thorough jobs of contrasting the various flavors of occasionalism among the Cartesians.
If the doctrine's interpretation destroys all natural causality, good Cartesians should reject it (and deviant ones, such as Malebranche and Cordemoy, should have done so).
I readily admit that both the Cartesian picture I will oppose and the alternative view offered in this article are caricatures.
The Cartesian conception (which I discuss in more detail below) places a strong emphasis on the first-person aspect of experience: minds are seen as uniquely accessible, intimately personal things, best conceived as the product of internal thought processes occurring within individuals.
Another question that can be asked is why the 3D Cartesian coordinate system uses 90[degrees] between any two of the six half-axes in the positive or negative direction?
Seen in this way, we can say that the Cartesian coordinate system was not the way to freedom of spirit, but rather a means of channelling it into a framework of organized thinking.
The authors' casual acceptance of species extinction is also disturbing and reflects a narrow conception of morality that I predict will soon be as outmoded, but perhaps as invidious, as the Cartesian legacy so thoroughly explored earlier.
Next, in '"Toute hyperbole tend la, de nous amener a la verite par l'exces de la verite, c'est-a-dire par la mensonge": les parcours hyperboliques qui amenent a la verite de Balzac a Descartes', Giulia Belgioioso traces the Cartesian notion of hyperbolic doubt to French man of letters Guez de Balzac, who had transformed the traditional rhetorical hyperbole into a methodological tool for seeking truth by means of an excess of lies.
Igor Agostini ('Caterus on God as "ens a se"') maintains that the Cartesian view of positive divine aseity was criticized by Caterus not for its original and unheard of character but rather because it was an attempt to resurrect a view that had already been shown to be untenable (since involving a contradiction).
Nyden-Bullock also discusses the elimination of any distinction between the will and intellect, calling it Spinoza's 'most radical departure from the Cartesian theory of error' (122).
Cartesian has developed innovative micro-dispensing technologies for a
81), "neoskeptics" who embrace a variant of skepticism that bases its doubts on "the prior acceptance of a Cartesian foundationalist model that consists of denying knowledge in the absence of an epistemological foundation" (p.