Carthaginian


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Related to Carthaginian: Carthaginian Wars

Carthaginian

1. of or relating to Carthage (an ancient N African city state) or its inhabitants
2. a native or inhabitant of Carthage
References in periodicals archive ?
As the lines crashed together, the Romans, who had deployed extra infantry in the center of the formation in hopes of breaking through the Carthaginian lines, found themselves outflanked by elite North African cavalry units.
Among these were the Canaanites, better known as Phoenicians, who later became known as the Carthaginians.
Gustavus Adolphus's victories in the Thirty Years War did not lead to vanquishing the Holy Roman Empire; the destruction of a Roman army at Cannae in 216 BC did not result in Carthaginian supremacy in the Mediterranean Sea and the destruction of Rome.
BERLIN The life of Hannibal, the Carthaginian general who marched over the Alps with dozens of war elephants, is heading for the small screen as part of the latest slate of projects from Teutonic entertainment outfit Victory Media and its Italian partner, DeAngelis Group.
(4) Now, a modern reader might assume that a play written by a Roman about a Carthaginian during the lifetime of many who remembered Roman civilian and military casualties of the Hannibalic War would mercilessly stereotype the Carthaginian as the lying, faithless enemy.
Mastermind BBC2, Fri, 7.30pm Every now and again, someone complains Britain's most prestigious quiz show is dumbing down - mainly because a contestant has chosen to be grilled on their favourite band or TV show, rather than, say, Carthaginian glassmaking.
The film told how the magnificent north African City of Carthage was destroyed by Rome in 146 BC, as the final act of the greatest conflict in the ancient world, the Punic (Carthaginian) Wars.
The film told how the magnificent north African City of Carthage was destroyed by Rome in 146BC, as the final act of the greatest conflict in the ancient world, the Punic (Carthaginian) Wars.
Their topics include historians verses geographers: divergent uses of the ethnic name Turdetania in the Greek and Roman tradition, the city as a structural element in Turdetanian identity in the work of Strabo, Carthaginians in Turdetania: Carthaginian presence in Iberia before 237 BCE, Tyrian connections: evolving identities in the Punic west, and the economy and Romanization of Hispania Ulterior (125-25 BCE): the role of the Italians.
The public will have the opportunity to discover for the first time and for two weeks a collection of over 2,000 Etruscan archaeological items belonging to the period from the 4th to the 7th century BC, with the exceptional exhibition of a unique object presenting the 1st and oldest passport in the world of a Carthaginian travelling to Etruria (Italy).
Scipio, a handsome young Roman general driven by a desire to avenge his father's death at Carthaginian hands, takes up the fight against Hannibal's brother, Hasdrubal, in Spain.