Carthaginian


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Related to Carthaginian: Carthaginian Wars

Carthaginian

1. of or relating to Carthage (an ancient N African city state) or its inhabitants
2. a native or inhabitant of Carthage
References in periodicals archive ?
According to him, the "Carthage and the Etruscans, an old friendship" exhibition illustrates that before Punic wars and clashes between the Carthaginians and the Romans, the Italic people had established privileged relations with the Carthaginians for about 4 to 6 centuries BC.
USA], Aug 14 ( ANI ): Analysis of ancient Roman coins has shown that the defeat of the Carthaginian general Hannibal Barca - one of the greatest military commanders in history - led to a flood of wealth across the Roman Empire from the silver mines of Spain.
Microbiologists claim the discovery is an almost perfect fit with Hannibal's Carthaginian army of the era.
Yet no Carthaginian peace was imposed on the loser, not even the peaceful occupation that the victorious Allies maintained for so many years after Nazi Germany's defeat in World War II.
Because Spain is not only Christian, it is also Arab and Jewish, Greek, Carthaginian and Roman, Gothic and Gypsy.
The Saltford Carthaginian coin: making history come alive (Lecture, Bath)
In our eager talk, I pretended we were crossing the Pyrenees and then the Alps, from Spain into Italy, with the great Carthaginian general, his elephants, his horses and his army of many nations.
In the letters of Cyprian (CCL 52), a Carthaginian bishop accuses one of his rebellious deacons, Felicissimus, not only of being schismatic but also of murdering his wife's unborn child.
So the Romans realised they were going to have to go after them at sea and began grabbing Carthaginian vessels and took them to pieces, found out how they built them and started to develop a navy.
Kimball recommends that Etienne Mantoux's The Carthaginian Peace (1941) provides a more accurate description of the shortcomings of the Treaty of Versailles' than Keynes' much acclaimed book.
Hasdrubal was Hannibal's brother, a Carthaginian general.
The authors begin by describing the historical background and after a short section on the historical reputation of Carthage and a chronology, there follows a twelve page chapter on the organisation of the Carthaginian armies.