Carthusians


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Related to Carthusians: Trappists, Cistercians

Carthusians

Carthusians (kärtho͞oˈzhənz), small order of monks of the Roman Catholic Church [Lat. abbr.,=O. Cart.]. It was established by St. Bruno at La Grande Chartreuse (see Chartreuse, Grande) in France in 1084. The Carthusians are peculiar among orders of Western monasticism in cultivating a nearly eremitical life: each monk lives by himself with cell and garden and, except for communal worship, scarcely meets the others. No order is more austere. The Carthusian enclosure is called charterhouse in English, and its architecture differs necessarily from that of the Benedictine abbey. The Charterhouse of London was famous, and the Certosa di Pavia, Italy, is an architectural monument. The Carthusians are devoted mainly to contemplation. In 1973 they numbered 440 members throughout the world, of whom there were 10 in the United States, living at the Charterhouse of Arlington, Vt. They are unchanging in their rule, their independence, and their original way of life. There are a very few Carthusian nuns following a similar rule. Chartreuse is the well-known liqueur manufactured by Carthusians in France.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And sale of Chartreuse financially supports Carthusians at monasteries as far-flung as South Korea and Brazil.
I have relied repeatedly on the following entries: "Benedict, Saint," "Benedictines," "Carthusians," "Chartreuse," "Cistercians," "Gregory I, Saint," "Monasticism," "Plainsong," "Trappists," and numerous cross-references, all of which provided meaningful jumping-off points for further exploration.
This is one of the main strengths of this book, as it speaks consistently to discourses and debates within Carthusian, monastic, Christian, Catholic, medieval, early modern, Enlightenment, Baroque, and other contexts.
This volume is an in-depth exploration of the Carthusian Miscellany (British Library MS Additional 37049), a fifteenth-century English manuscript of texts and drawings known to medieval scholars mainly through its facsimile produced by James Hogg in 1981.
In February 1999, I started to research An Infinity of Little Hours, a book about the life of Carthusian hermit monks.
The members of the pop group Genesis are Old Carthusians. To which public school does this name apply?
12) Old Carthusians were the first team to win both the FA Amateur Cup and FA Cup.
2005), I think, should have mentioned some religious groups that had for their motto "To work is to pray." These, of course, were the various Catholic religious orders who took wasteland in Europe, North and South America, and Africa and turned them into rich farm lands--the Benedictines, Trappists, and the Carthusians, just to name a few.
Even silent close-ups of the Carthusians' faces, staring inscrutably out at the viewer, can be directly compared with monks' portraits by the great Flemish masters.
Part ii looks at 'Carthusian Links with Female Spirituality' through Marleen Cre's examination of the Amherst manuscript as a context for Julian's Short Text and the Mirror of Simple Souls, and two essays that draw attention to works written by Carthusians for women that deserve to be better known: Rebecca Selman on the Speculum Devotorum and Anne McGovern-Mouron on the ps.-Bernard Liber de modo bene vivendi ad sororem.
A It was the first man-for-man marking system, devised by the brothers AM and PM Walters, who played right-back and left-back for the amateur club Old Carthusians back in the 1880s.
With his imprisonment in the Tower on April 17, 1534, for his refusal to take the oath to the Act of Succession, More's life came full circle, from the confines of a cell with the Carthusians thirty years before to his cell in the Tower of London, each entered under different circumstances for the service of God.