Cartouche


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Cartouche

(kärto͞osh`), 1693–1721, nickname of Louis Dominique Bourguignon, French highwayman. His band terrorized the Paris area until his capture. He was broken on the wheel. Cartouche's daring exploits have been celebrated in stories, dramas, ballads, and popular prints.

Cartouche

A decorative ornamental tablet resembling a scroll of paper with the center either inscribed or left plain; but framed with an elaborate scroll-like carving.

Cartouche

 

an ornament in the shape of a shield or a partially unrolled scroll, on which a coat of arms, emblem, or inscription was placed. Carved or stucco cartouches decorated the main entrances of palaces. Cartouches also appeared on geographic maps, tombstones, and ancient documents. The ornament was widely used in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries.

REFERENCE

Hadergott, B. Die Kartusche…. Gottingen, 1955.

cartouche

[kar′tüsh]
(graphic arts)
A border or scroll that is decorative and executed with a pen or brush.

cartouche

1. An ornamental tablet often inscribed or decorated, and framed with elaborate scroll-like carving.
2. A modillion of curved form.
3. In Egyptian hieroglyphics and derivatives, a frame around the Pharaoh’s name.

cartouche

, cartouch
1. a carved or cast ornamental tablet or panel in the form of a scroll, sometimes having an inscription
2. an oblong figure enclosing characters expressing royal or divine names in Egyptian hieroglyphics
3. the paper case holding combustible materials in certain fireworks
References in periodicals archive ?
To insure reliable functioning in the MAS 38, the 7.65L was loaded with a slightly longer bullet of the same weight that was known as the Cartouche de 7.65L pour pistolet-mitrailleur Modele 1938.
* Cartouche 8mm balle D (a m) to prevent primers from backing out of the case, a special cartridge was developed for the Modele 1917, the 8mm balle D (a m) (amorcage modifie--modified primer) which used a heavy crimp ta secure the primer in place.
Cover with a buttered Cartouche and place the lid on top.
It also uses a new, contemporary font named "Hilton," which was custom-designed for the brand and features a smaller cartouche that provides a modern look and places more emphasis on the Hilton name.
The same applies to the cartouches, the motif of an oval frame that Verkoyen has borrowed from the Dutch Porcelain.
in Monterrey, Mexico, said that even mainstream producers are striving to differentiate their packages with elaborate cartouches and direct screening.
Henricus Hondius is recorded as publisher in the title cartouche, and the Australian coastline shows all but two of the known Dutch discoveries up to 1627: "those of Hartog in 1616, the Van Leeuwin in 1622, Nuyts in 1627 and 'Houtmans Abrolhos' are named, referring to Houtman's 1619 exploits" (10).
A cartouche is the conventional way in which ancient Egyptian writers, artists, and sculptors indicated that a name was royal; it took the form of an oval frame around the hieroglyphics of the name, punctuated by a bar at the end, and could be composed vertically or horizontally.
REKIC: A wooden plaque (above) carved with a cartouche containing the name of Rameses II, one of Egypt's greatest pharoahs (1290-1223BC).
In retelling the lives of real-life villains, like Cartouche in France, Jaco in the Netherlands, or John Sheppard in England, writers began to construct the idea of an underworld and a counter-culture that mirrored and parodied respectable society.
The first state of the map [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURES 9, 10 OMITTED], in which the doge and dogaressa are framed in a cartouche, offers a clue to understanding how the map and the processions work.
Jones reads the later site/nonsite pieces and earthworks such as Spiral Jetty in the context of early drawings and "cartouche" collages (works containing a central element such as a newspaper clipping or piece of industrial material ringed by Smithson's erotic drawings).