Cascading Style Sheets


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Cascading Style Sheets

(World-Wide Web)
(CSS) An extension to HTML to allow styles, e.g. colour, font, size to be specified for certain elements of a hypertext document. Style information can be included in-line in the HTML file or in a separate CSS file (which can then be easily shared by multiple HTML files). Multiple levels of CSS can be used to allow selective overriding of styles.

http://w3.org/Style/CSS/.

Cascading Style Sheets

A style sheet format for HTML documents endorsed by the World Wide Web Consortium. CSS1 (Version 1.0) provided hundreds of layout settings that can be applied to all the subsequent HTML pages that are downloaded. CSS2 (Version 2.0) added support for XML, oral presentations for the visually impaired, downloadable fonts and other enhancements.

Comprising some 50 modules, CSS3 (Version 3.0) added features such as vertical text, elaborate borders and backgrounds, user interaction and greater device and browser detection. For information, visit www.w3.org/Style/CSS/. See HTML, style sheet and XSL.
References in periodicals archive ?
This beginner guide demonstrates how cascading style sheets can be used to define styles to items in Web pages, rather than format each item individually.
The utility creates Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), supporting both level 1 and level 2 CSS standards, as defined by the World Wide Web Consortium.
This text for web designers offers thoughtful discussion on how to create cascading style sheets and how to apply those in progressively more advanced design tasks.
Using library collection records as examples, Ng (Queens College, CUNY) explains the structure of an XML encoded document, illustrates the role of cascading style sheets (CSS), and introduces document type definitions (DTD).
Designed and written specifically to enable librarians to utilize XML to create and organize documents, fine-tune documents with special characters, using Cascading Style Sheets, and displaying information on a library website, "Using XML: a How-To-Do-It Manual and CD-ROM For Librarians by Kwong Bor NG (Associate Professor, Graduate School of Library and Information Studies, Queens College, CUNY) truly lives up to its promise as a 'librarian friendly' instructional manual which deftly combines a clearly written, step-by-step presentation with an accompanying CD-ROM which reproduces every exercise so librarians can compare their work on a chapter-by-chapter basis to insure that the documents they create are displaying properly.
Cascading style sheets are the heart of some of the most popular web sites but getting them to work with HTML can be frustrating.
After using the O'Reilly publication Cascading style sheets: The definitive guide, written by Eric Meyer, I was anxious to receive Meyer's new book, cascading style sheets 2.
In spite of concerted developer action, Microsoft's next major release of its Internet Explorer web browser, IE5, going to come out without 100% support for the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)'s Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).
Implement Cascading Style Sheets, Themes and Master Pages for overall consistency
He assumes readers to be comfortable with simple HTML, but not necessarily with Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) or JavaScript.
The second half of the book focuses on writing proper cascading style sheets (CSS) code and getting XHTML documents to pay attention to source instructions.
The chapters that describe cascading style sheets, JavaScript, XML, and XHTML include explanations meant to help readers with less experience.