case law

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case law

law established by following judicial decisions given in earlier cases
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84) This and earlier statements of general principles of care, skill, and caution (collectively, "prudence") were developed, applied, and elaborated in the caselaw.
Beyond entry barriers and profitability margins, extant caselaw and academic literature propose a number of other criteria to judge market power directly--that is to say, without resort to market definition and market shares.
Later caselaw softens the demands of "minimal impairment.
The eases discussed above, as well as numerous others in the caselaw, leave little doubt as to the veracity of the proposition that failure to prepare an EIS is likely to result in an adverse decision against the applicant.
There is support for this in American(208) and Scottish(209) caselaw, but Millett L.
134) This view, however, is based on a cursory and incomplete assessment of the caselaw.
The Court would not line up a set of precedents favoring equal participation on one side, with Buckley on the other, as Dworkin himself does, to see whether this principle of equal participation is a better "fit" with the Court's caselaw as a whole.
248) After discussing the caselaw, which demonstrated that equity would not enjoin a tax unless there was no adequate remedy at law, the Court said:
Because of the leadership displayed by federal courts in construing the doctrine, this article limits its discussion to federal caselaw, implying the conclusion that federal opinions are a bellwether for the application of the doctrine within most every U.
Hayes Law Reports (Wilmington, DE) has begun the publication, of Hayes Law Reports: E-Commerce and Technology, a monthly newsletter that covers caselaw developments in intellectual property and e-commerce law.
As I made clear in the legislative debate following the President's veto, however, the disputed language in the Statement of Managers was simply meant to explain that the Conference Committee omitted the Specter amendment because that amendment did not adequately reflect existing Second Circuit caselaw on the pleading standard.