Cassandra

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Cassandra

(kəsăn`drə), in Greek legend, Trojan princess, daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the power of prophecy by Apollo, but because she would not accept him as a lover, he changed her blessing to a curse, causing her prophecies never to be believed. While seeking refuge from the Greeks during the Trojan War, she was dragged from the temple of Athena and violated by the Locrian Ajax. After the war she was the slave of Agamemnon and was killed with him by his wife Clytemnestra. She was also known as Alexandra.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cassandra

 

in ancient Greek mythology, the daughter of the Trojan king Priam and Hecuba.

Captivated by Cassandra’s beauty, the god Apollo endowed her with the gift of prophecy. But after she rejected him, Apollo decreed that no one would believe her prophecies. The Trojans, in particular, did not heed the words of Cassandra, who cautioned Paris against abducting Helen, an act that triggered the Trojan War. After the capture of Troy by the Greeks, Agamemnon took Cassandra captive; she died with him at the hands of his wife, Clytemnestra.

Figuratively, the term “Cassandra’s prophecies” means gloomy predictions that are mistrusted by listeners.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cassandra

no one gave credence to her accurate prophecies of doom. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 51]

Cassandra

true prophet, doomed to go unbelieved. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 40]
See: Irony

Cassandra

no credence ever given to her truthful prophecies of doom. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 51]

Cassandra

always accurate but fated to be disbelieved, predicts doom of Troy to brother, Hector. [Br. Lit.: Troilus and Cressida; Gk. Myth.: Parrinder, 57]

Cassandra

raped by Ajax the Less on the night Troy fell. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 17]
See: Rape

Cassandra

commits suicide to escape the Athenians. [Fr. Opera: Berlioz, The Trojans, Westerman, 174]
See: Suicide
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the preview of (http://www.ibtimes.com/librarians-season-4-episode-8-synopsis-teases-cassandras-unpleasant-getaway-2638212) "The Librarians" Season 4, episode 8 , different types of accidents take place when Cassandra is introduced to the town.
The sneak peek even shows Cassandra attending the gathering and raises the question: "Can anyone think of an object that turned up recently?" A woman from the crowd then responds to the query by pointing at Cassandra for being that "object" that entered the town recently and possibly causing the domino-like accidents in the area.
For more information, to arrange an interview or for a review copy of The Twelve Attunements, please contact: Cassandra Sturdy, Phone: +61 (0) 420 861 101 Email: cassandrasturdy@gmail.com Web: www.cassandrasturdy.com