Cassivellaunus


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Cassivellaunus

(kă'sĭvĭlô`nəs), fl. 54 B.C., British chieftain, a leader in the resistance against the invasion of Julius Caesar in 54 B.C. Caesar crossed the Thames River into Cassivellaunus's home country. Aided by discontented British tribes, he attacked Cassivellaunus in his strong fort in the marshes (probably at Wheathampstead, Hertfordshire) and drove the Britons out with heavy losses. Cassivellaunus sued for peace, which Caesar granted in return for hostages and an annual tribute.
References in periodicals archive ?
He survives by being identified with Caesar's Mandubracius, young leader of the Trinovantes, who sought Caesar's protection from Cassivellaunus, who had slain Mandubracius's father (259, 263).
The poet makes the first such allusion with his treatment of King Cassivellaunus - "Cassibalane" (stanza 47) - the hero who resisted Caesar's invasions.
Caesar's Cassivellaunus was not a king as such, and he was not even mentioned as being a factor in Caesar's first invasion; he was elected temporary leader by other petty chieftains in order to resist Caesar's second invasion (249): he was indeed by the people chosen.