cassone

(redirected from Cassoni)
Also found in: Dictionary.

cassone

(käs-sô`nā), the Italian term for chest or coffer, usually a bridal or dower chest, highly ornate and given prominence in the home. Major artists such as Uccello and Botticelli painted cassone panels, and prominent sculptors were also employed to carve elaborate chests. The cassone was usually decorated with mythological or historical episodes. It became one of the first means of bold secular expression in Renaissance art.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cassone

 

a type of wooden chest popular in Italy during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Its front and side walls were decorated with gilded and red stucco, carvings, and paintings (usually of a secular character). Such eminent artists as Botticelli and Uccello worked on cassoni. In the late 15th century architectural influence in its trimming increased: the sides were often divided into panels with carving and intarsia.

REFERENCES

Faenson, L. “Ital’ianskie svadebnye sunduki.”Dekorativnoe iskusstvo SSSR, 1967, no.l.
Schubring, P. Cassone. Leipzig, 1923.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study was funded by Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES) attributed to Cynthia Cassoni.
The companies also announced that as part of the agreement with GFI, Marisa Cassoni, Frank Fanzilli Jr.
Buschini A, Cassoni F, Anceschi E, Pasini L, Poli P, Rossi C.
Cassoni et al., "Value of staging squamous cell carcinoma of the anal margin and canal using the sentinel lymph node procedure: an update of the series and a review of the literature," British Journal of Cancer, vol.
This presentation is also rich in thematic galleries, presenting the great figures of 15th-century Florence; a gallery dedicated to the domestic interior with panels from marriage chests (cassoni) and a selection of maiolica; and another addressing the relationship of painting and sculpture.