castor bean

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Related to Castor oil plant: ricin, castor bean plant, castor beans

castor bean

castor bean, bean produced by Ricinus communis, a plant of the spurge family, widely cultivated as an ornamental. Moles die when they eat the roots. It has long been used as an ordeal poison in parts of Africa. Ricin, the toxic protein found in the bean seeds, can be extracted and used as a poison or chemical weapon, but it is not as poisonous or as readily absorbed as other such weapons. Castor oil is also extracted from the beans.
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castor bean

[′kas·tər ‚bēn]
(botany)
The seed of the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis), a coarse, erect annual herb in the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae) of the order Geraniales.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of this study was to determine the repellent effect of the hydroethanolic extracts of the wild and Mirante variety of the castor oil plant on the agave weevil in the laboratory.
Within hours, our reporter had bought the castor oil plant and other ingredients needed to make the poison.
Thus, the objective of this study was to calculate the type I error and the power of the LRT for determining the independence between two groups of castor oil plant traits under a multivariate normal distribution in scenarios consisting of the combinations of 16 sample sizes; 40 combinations of the number of traits from the two groups; and nine degrees of correlation between the traits (for the power).
Other common garden plants that should not be ingested are foxglove, the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis), delphiniums, lupins, bluebells, amaryllis, symphytum, daphne and brugmansia.
Ricin is a highly toxic, naturally occurring lectin produced in the seeds of the castor oil plant, Ricinus communis.
The castor oil plant (Ricinus communis L.) is a member of the Spurge family of plants (Euphorbiaceae).
Fatsia japonica is known as the false Castor Oil plant, but the only connection between the two plants is their large palmate leaves.
Also known as the false castor oil plant, it has a strong architectural presence with its all-year large glossy leaves and can take up a large space, reaching 3m x 3m (10ft x 10ft) when fully grown.