Boiga

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Boiga

 

a genus of reptiles of the grass snake family. The Boiga is as long as 1.5 m and sometimes 2 m. There are about 30 species. The majority are distributed in southern Asia and Indonesia, and a few species are found in tropical Africa and Australia. The Boiga inhabits trees and shrubs, and more rarely, the ground (in open places); it has even penetrated the desert. It is extremely mobile and cunning and often bites. The Boiga’s bite is relatively harmless to humans because its grooved, poisonous fangs are located deep inside its mouth, and the poison usually does not enter the wound at the time of the bite. If it does, it causes only temporary painful symptoms. The Boiga is nocturnal. It feeds on lizards and small birds and animals. All Boigas are oviparous. The Indian Boiga (B. trigonatum) is the best known. It is yellowish brown with light, narrow spots along the spine. B. trigonatum is found in Ceylon, India, Pakistan, and eastern Iran; in the USSR, it is found in the Turkmen SSR and the Tadzhik SSR.

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Table 1 gives details of unpublished Arabian cat snake records from Oman since 1989.
Indeed, it is somewhat surprising that the Arabian cat snake has not been recorded until now (Gardner 2005, Gardner 2008).
Table 1: Unpublished Arabian cat snake records from Oman and the UAE.
With rather few records, one cannot draw firm conclusions, but perhaps the northern Hajar Arabian cat snakes are mainly of this colour morph.
The Arabian cat snake (pg 124) can reach a larger size than indicated, as I have measured one from 113.
There have also been several sightings of the Cat Snake, which have provoked panic as this species resembles the highly-venomous Blunt Nosed Viper.
Other topics include the rainbow serpent, the snipers: vine snakes, the night shift: boas and pythons, the poisoners: tree vipers, and Old World cat snakes.