catechol

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catechol

[′kad·ə‚kȯl]
(organic chemistry)
One of a group of three isomeric dihydroxy benzenes in which the two hydroxyl groups are ortho to each other. Also known as catechin; pyrocatechol; pyrocatechuic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, it is reasonable to suggest that an MMT functionalized polymeric coating agent may be applied readily to various metal and nonmetal surfaces using adhesive catechol chemistry [10].
5 Case Hormone 1 -- 2 Urine catechols ([dagger]) 3 Urine VMAT ([dagger]) 4 Urine VMA, HVA ([dagger]) 5 Urine catechols ([dagger]) 6 Urine catechols ([dagger]) 7 None 8 None 9 None 10 None 11 None 12 Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) [up arrow] Case Metastasis Treatment Survival 1 Liver, para-aortic nodes None -- 2 None CR 3.
22) These 2-hydroxy catechols are considered to have weak oestrogenic activity as they have weak binding capacity to oestrogen receptors and are associated with normal cellular differentiation and apoptosis.
Studies on the methylation of catechol estrogens, catechol amines and other catechols by the catechol-O-methyltransferase of human liver.
2006); among these chlorinated hydrocarbons, benzenes, phenols, catechols, guaiacols, syringols, vanillins, chloroform, dioxins and furans etc.
The team incorporated catechols into the alginate macromolecules that make up their hydrogel.
The findings of our present study provide a general mechanistic basis for the notion that a variety of dietary catechols can function as inhibitors of DNA methylation through increased formation of SAH during the COMT-mediated O-methylation of these dietary chemicals.
Lignin-derived pyrolysis products are guaiacols, further, catechols and o-cresols, further, phenol and p-cresol, and formic and acetic acids (Hosoya et al.
The NBT reaction indicates the presence of redox active compounds while the Arnow staining specifically labels catechols, including DOPA.
Catechols and N-hydroxylated ligands (such as L-Glutathione) which can be considered as biological sequestering agents for a large class of metal ions, are particularly effective in stabilizing high oxidation state for elements such as vanadium and molybdenum (Aliyu and Nwabueze, 2007).
Pyrolysis rearranges guaiacols, catechols, syringols, vanillins, furancarboxaldehydes, isoeugenol, pyrones, acetic acid, formic acid, and other carboxylic acids (Piskorz et al.
The strategy uses a simple acid catalyst and relatively stable molecules called protected catechols to assemble key organic molecules into a neatly ordered two-dimensional sheet.