Cather


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Cather

Willa (Sibert). 1873--1947, US novelist, whose works include O Pioneers! (1913) and My Ántonia (1918)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Scholars and readers associate Willa Cather with Nebraska and Pittsburgh, Ernest Hemingway and F.
"Two Friends," a representative story by Cather, written in 1931 but tacitly alluding to events that occurred decades earlier, first appeared in the Woman's Home Companion, an Ohio magazine that catered to farmers and homemakers.
Through an analysis of realist novels by Mark Twain, Henry James, Edith Wharton, and Willa Cather, Polley argues that realism engages romanticism--specifically, the transcendental theories of Ralph Waldo Emerson--and holds earlier romantic ideas in a dialogic discourse with realism.
Now entering his final year in the evening program at UM Carey, Cather said a degree to expand his skillset has become a new way of thinking and allowed him to make contacts throughout the region.
Anne Cather & husband Edward Etzel, Carl H Cather, III, & his wife Victoria Liberatore, Tyler Cather, who predeceased him, and Joan Carol Cather, all of Morgantown.
The first section "Translation" features writers that reflect on Cather's curious devaluation of My Antonia's reception over time; translation issues in Germany, Italty, France, and Russia; and linguistic issues in the novel's vision of Antonia's acculturation.
As in her earlier novels, Willa Cather's 1925 novel The Professor's House develops keen insights into US culture as it presents a complex world marked by status anxiety.
When Cather was only ten years old, her family moved from Virginia to Nebraska.
By working together with the Dowell, Cather and other GNM and TM members were able to draw up a better solution for all.
"Libby Larsen's Margaret Songs: A Musical Portrait of Willa Cather's Margaret Elliot." DMA Dissertation, Arizona State University, 2013, 73 pages; ProQuest3559338.
The Selected Letters of Willa Cather, edited by Andrew Jewell and Janis Stout.
Willa Cather's reluctance to categorize Death Comes for the Archbishop as a novel is telling; in a letter to The Commonweal she says that she "prefer[s] to call it a narrative" (On Writing 12), and she draws aesthetic parallels between her text and the frescoes detailing the life of St.