Catherine of Braganza


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Related to Catherine of Braganza: Charles I, James II

Catherine of Braganza

(brəgăn`zə), 1638–1705, queen consort of Charles II of England, daughter of John IV of Portugal. She was married to Charles in 1662. As part of her dowry England secured Bombay (now Mumbai) and Tangier. Unpopular in England for her Roman Catholic faith, she also had to suffer the humiliation of her husband's infidelities and the disappointment of her own childlessness. In 1678 she was accused by Titus OatesOates, Titus,
1649–1705, English conspirator. An Anglican priest whose whole career was marked with intrigue and scandal, he joined forces with one Israel Tonge to invent the story of the Popish Plot of 1678.
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 of a plot to poison the king but was protected from the charge by Charles himself. After William III's accession she returned to Portugal, where she supported the commercial Treaty of Methuen (1703) with England, and in 1704 she acted as regent for her brother, Peter II.

Catherine of Braganza

1638--1705, wife of Charles II of England, daughter of John IV of Portugal
References in periodicals archive ?
James's Palace may have been open to other family members, including the queen, Catherine of Braganza.
For the rest of Europe - even the nations to the north that eventually became the United Kingdom, which today has the highest per-capita consumption - tea remained unknown until Catherine of Braganza, a Portuguese princess, arrived to marry Charles II of England.
In 1660, London diarist Samuel Pepys 'did send for a Cupp of Tee (a China drink) of which I never drank before' and two years later, when Charles II was betrothed to Catherine of Braganza, the bride-to-be asked for a cup of tea when she disembarked in Portsmouth (the drink still being very rare at the time, she was offered ale instead).Tea increased in popularity throughout the mid-19th century after the seventh Duchess of Bedford invented the institution of afternoon tea.
After the Restoration the Royal Charles became the flagship of the Royal Navy and she continued to play a symbolic role, leading, for example, the squadron that went to Lisbon to collect Charles II's bride, the Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza in 1662.
Bramah traced British teadrinking to King Charles II's wife, Catherine of Braganza, who introduced it to courtiers.
If by "inauthentic" we mean those who pretend at something, then this historical period is rife with pretense, from the Earl of Rochester, who masqueraded as an astrologer and mountebank, to Charles II and his queen, Catherine of Braganza, who dressed in disguise to drop in on local fairs or even entertainments given by strangers.
Indeed, was it not the case that in order to firm up the relationship, Catherine of Braganza married King Charles II in 1661?
Your second battalion dates back to the time when Queen Catherine of Braganza brought Bombay as part of her dowry to King Charles II.
He was married to the virginal Queen Catherine of Braganza (Shirley Henderson), who was unable to bear him a child, but he had several illegitimate ones from his numerous conquests.
Jacob Huysmans, on the contrary, found nothing amusing in the notion of depicting the Queen, Catherine of Braganza, as a shepherdess (Royal Collection).
Meanwhile, in New York City, plans to erect a statue in honor of Catherine of Braganza, after whom Queens County was named, are giving way to a proposal for building a Museum of Tolerance across the East River from the United Nations.