ablation

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ablation

1. Medicine the surgical removal of an organ, structure, or part
2. Astronautics the melting or wearing away of an expendable part, such as the heat shield of a space re-entry vehicle on passing through the earth's atmosphere
3. Geology the wearing away of a rock or glacier
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ablation

(ab-lay -shŏn) The loss of material from the surface of a moving body as a result of vaporization, friction, etc. For example, atmospheric atoms and molecules erode the surface of a meteoroid and damage the protective heat shield of a returning space shuttle.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ablation

 

in glaciology, the wasting of the mass of a glacier or snow cover as a result of thawing, evaporation, or mechanical removal—for example, wind ablation or the falling of icebergs. It is caused chiefly by climatic factors.

Three types of ablation are distinguished according to place of appearance: subglacial (or bottom), internal, and surface. The internal heat of the earth, springs (particularly warm ones) surfacing in the glacier bed, and heat caused by the friction of the glacier in its bed are some of the causes of subglacial ablation. Internal ablation is caused by friction between the glacier components and by the circulation of water and air. The glacier surface receives warmth predominantly from solar radiation and from the air. The thermal balance of the glacier surface is the basis of all surface ablation processes. The term “ablation” is sometimes used as well as a synonym for “surface washoff.”

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ablation

[ə′blā·shən]
(aerospace engineering)
The intentional removal of material from a nose cone or spacecraft during high-speed movement through a planetary atmosphere to provide thermal protection to the underlying structure.
(geology)
The wearing away of rocks, as by erosion or weathering.
(hydrology)
The reduction in volume of a glacier due to melting and evaporation.
(medicine)
The removal of tissue or a part of the body by surgery, such as by excision or amputation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Many studies have shown that catheter ablation for A-fib can be done safely in older adults, even over age 80," says Dr.
Key products segmented in the global EP catheter ablation market are:
Packer, with catheter ablation receiving a firmer endorsement for patients with HF the next time U.S.
Catheter ablation should now be "strongly considered" in patients with heart failure and AFib, he said, although he also had three qualifications for opting for this approach: Patients must already be on guideline-directed medical therapy for their heart failure, the catheter ablation needs to be performed by an experienced and skilled operator, and follow-up surveillance must focus on both the patient's AFib and heart failure.
They are generally benign; in rare situations, like in the presence of structural heart disease, they can have catastrophic consequences because of rapid heart rates.1 SVTs, if recurrent, can result in significant impairment in the quality of life.2 An electrophysiological study (EPS) is recommended for patients with symptomatic, paroxysmal SVT.3 Often, long-term medical therapy for SVTs is ineffective because of recurrent episodes despite the use of medications.4 Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) has become the treatment of choice due to its high primary success rates and low complication rates.5-7 The field of clinical cardiac electrophysiology has evolved dramatically over the last 30 years, beginning with the first description of the His bundle (H) recording in 1969.8
Long-term outcomes after catheter ablation of cavo-tricuspid isthmus dependent atrial flutter: a metaanalysis.
Wazni's patients are still maintaining normal sinus rhythm 10 years after undergoing catheter ablation. Still, he cautions that a recurrence of Afib is always possible.
The flecainide provocative test (2 mg/kg for 10 minutes) was performed after three months of catheter ablation which revealed unmasking of type I Brugada pattern (Figure 3(d)).
Sixty four out of these patients (75%) underwent a first time RF catheter ablation and 21 patients (25%) underwent cryoballoon catheter ablation.
The Chinese Heart Rhythm Society (CHRS) put forward the “AF catheter ablation safety improvement initiative,” and put “Restore normal rhythm with doubled safety” as this year's conference theme for CHRS 2017.
(1) Current treatments for AFib are cardioversion, prescription medication for management of rate and/or rhythm control, and, when all else fails, surgery or catheter ablation. A single ablation procedure may not consistently eliminate AFib and repeat ablations are sometimes required to eradicate this disease state.