Cattle Tick


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Related to Cattle Tick: Rhipicephalus microplus

Cattle Tick

 

(Boophilus calcaratus), an arthropod animal of the family Ixodidae. It feeds on the blood of cattle, sheep, horses, and camels. The size of the hungry tick is 2-3 mm, but when the tick is full of blood it is as large as 18 mm. Cattle ticks are prevalent in the USSR in the southern Ukraine, the Caucasus, and Middle Asia. The female deposits eggs in soil cracks under rocks. From the eggs six-legged larvae hatch; these attack an animal, suck its blood, and, moulting, turn into eight-legged nymphs, which then become the adult ticks. The whole cycle of development takes place on the same host animal (as the cattle tick is a single-host tick) and lasts 50 to 60 days. There are two or three generations per year. The cattle tick causes exhaustion in the host animals and transmits piroplasms, which cause the disease of cattle called piroplasmosis. Cattle ticks are controlled by using acaricides to destroy them.

References in periodicals archive ?
Acaricidal activity of Palicourea marcgravii, a species from the Amazon forest, on cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.
Ansell, "Resistance of Holstein-Friesian cows to infestation by the cattle tick (Boophilus microplus)," Veterinary Parasitology, vol.
Lonardoni et al., "Acaricidal activity of the essential oil from Tetradenia riparia (Lamiaceae) on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari; Ixodidae)," Experimental Parasitology, vol.
The novel mitochondrial gene arrangement of the cattle tick, Boophilus microplus: five fold tandem repetition of a coding region.
The productivity effects of cattle tick (Boophilus microplus) infestation on cattle with particular reference to Bos indicus cattle and their crosses.
Larval immersion tests with ivermectin in populations of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) from State of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Green, "Possible risk factors on Queensland dairy farms for acaricide resistance in cattle tick (Boophilus microplus)," Veterinary Parasitology, vol.
For example, Rhipicephalus evertsi (not a North American species) uses only two hosts, and the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus (essentially eradicated from the United States in the 1940s), parasitizes only one.
Blood concentration in the cattle tick (Boophilus microplus) is greatest during the last hours of final feeding when engorged females consumed a concentrated blood meal twice their own weight (Seifert et al.