Catullus

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Catullus

(Caius Valerius Catullus) (kətŭl`əs), 84? B.C.–54? B.C., Roman poet, b. Verona. Of a well-to-do family, he went c.62 B.C. to Rome. He fell deeply in love, probably with Clodia, sister of Cicero's opponent Publius Clodius. She was suspected of murdering her husband. Catullus wrote to his beloved, addressed as Lesbia (to recall Sappho of Lesbos), a series of superb little poems that run from early passion and tenderness to the hatred and disillusionment that overwhelmed him after his mistress was faithless. Of the 116 extant poems attributed to him, three (18–20) are almost certainly spurious. They include, besides the Lesbia poems, poems to his young friend Juventius; epigrams, ranging from the genial to the obscenely derisive; elegies; a few long poems, notably "Attis" and a nuptial poem honoring Thetis and Peleus; and various short pieces. His satire is vigorous and flexible, his light poems joyful and full-bodied. He was influenced by the Alexandrians and drew much on the Greeks for form and meter, but his genius outran all models. Catullus is one of the greatest lyric poets of all time. Two of his most popular poems are the 10-line poem, touching and simple, which ends, "frater ave atque vale" [hail, brother, and farewell], and "On the Death of Lesbia's Sparrow."

Bibliography

See translations by R. Myers and R. J. Ormsby (1970), C. Martin (1990), and P. Green (2005); studies by A. L. Wheeler (1934, repr. 1964), T. Frank (1928, repr. 1965), K. Quinn (1959, 1970, and 1972), R. Jenkyns (1982), T. P. Wiseman (1985), J. Ferguson (1988), and C. Martin (1992).

Catullus

Gaius Valerius . ?84--?54 bc, Roman lyric poet, noted particularly for his love poems
References in periodicals archive ?
The general reluctance to include Juventius as a Catullan paramour in the stories of the poet's life has undoubtedly been shaped by cultural mores surrounding homoerotic relations.
In the next morning's seaside lament, he makes his Attis recall the Catullan speaker of Poems 8 and 76: "Miss her I miss her--queer end doom's that I am, hot what
Such studied corresponsion and contrast in the Catullan corpus should not be surprising in poetry which looks to Callimachus as its literary model - or foil.
28) Details showing similarity between Catullan love and the love of Laodamia: (i) The simile suggesting Laodamia's non-physical love (119ff.
It seems likely that Skelton, a clergyman, was as conscious of the biblical connotations of the sparrow as of the Catullan tradition: it is possible, in fact, that he intended both symbolic valences to play in the minds of his readers.
Pliny then describes how he tried his hand at other metres, including elegiacs ([sections]7), and settled on producing the volume of hendecasyllables ([sections]8) (once more following in Catullan footsteps), which Pontius, the letter's addressee, has just read.
5) I believe further light can be shed on the divided consciousness of the Catullan ego through an analysis of the dynamic, shifting relationships of multiple speaking voices in the anguished poems about Lesbia.
The basic quantitative scansion (sans accent locations or alternate feet) of a Catullan line would be as follows:
The natural flow of Catullan hendecasyllables depends on a metre that seems ideally suited to the cadence of the Latin language.
I will then place these verses in their French surroundings and pursue the insights that an awareness of the Catullan context makes available for interpretations of the essay.
His voice is Callimachan, Catullan, Sapphic; his style is like Bunting's, Loy's, Niedecker's; his forms are epigrams, sonnets, translations; and his appetites, by his own admission, are "Food, sex, poetry, not necessarily / In that order [ldots] " (107).
Because he is a poet, literary composition constitutes for Catullus a crucial factor in establishing and sustaining amicitiae, one consequence of which is that the very act of literary composition in the service of friendship becomes an important theme in Catullan poetry.