Catullus

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Catullus

(Caius Valerius Catullus) (kətŭl`əs), 84? B.C.–54? B.C., Roman poet, b. Verona. Of a well-to-do family, he went c.62 B.C. to Rome. He fell deeply in love, probably with Clodia, sister of Cicero's opponent Publius Clodius. She was suspected of murdering her husband. Catullus wrote to his beloved, addressed as Lesbia (to recall Sappho of Lesbos), a series of superb little poems that run from early passion and tenderness to the hatred and disillusionment that overwhelmed him after his mistress was faithless. Of the 116 extant poems attributed to him, three (18–20) are almost certainly spurious. They include, besides the Lesbia poems, poems to his young friend Juventius; epigrams, ranging from the genial to the obscenely derisive; elegies; a few long poems, notably "Attis" and a nuptial poem honoring Thetis and Peleus; and various short pieces. His satire is vigorous and flexible, his light poems joyful and full-bodied. He was influenced by the Alexandrians and drew much on the Greeks for form and meter, but his genius outran all models. Catullus is one of the greatest lyric poets of all time. Two of his most popular poems are the 10-line poem, touching and simple, which ends, "frater ave atque vale" [hail, brother, and farewell], and "On the Death of Lesbia's Sparrow."

Bibliography

See translations by R. Myers and R. J. Ormsby (1970), C. Martin (1990), and P. Green (2005); studies by A. L. Wheeler (1934, repr. 1964), T. Frank (1928, repr. 1965), K. Quinn (1959, 1970, and 1972), R. Jenkyns (1982), T. P. Wiseman (1985), J. Ferguson (1988), and C. Martin (1992).

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Catullus

Gaius Valerius . ?84--?54 bc, Roman lyric poet, noted particularly for his love poems
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
28.--Madame Judith Gautier, daughter of the novelist and poet, Theophile Gautier, and at one time wife of the late Catulle Mendes, has been elected to the Goncourt Academy of Letters.
(11.) Louis Laloy, La musique retrouvee 1902-1927 (Paris: Librairie Plon, 1928), 121: "Ce n'est pas le hasard qui, des son retour de Rome, lui avait fait rechercher, seul de ses camarades, l'elite des ecrivains, consulter par exemple Henri de Regnier, qui me l'a raconte depuis, sur son texte des Proses lyriques, quand Catulle Mendes etait la, tout pret a l'entreprendre."
The plural and more general miserarum referring to unspecified females lost in love form a striking contrast to the masculine singular, specifically identified miser Catulle of Poem 8.
In 1899, Hahn composed the Douze Rondels cycle, written for soloist and choir, to poetry of Charles D'Orleans, Theodore de Banville, and Catulle Mendes.
These precursors include Catulle Mendes, Jean Lorrain, Pierre Louys, Rachilde, and J.
Indeed, throughout his life he encountered many prominent political and cultural figures, a number of whom make cameo appearances in this biography; these include Jules Massenet, Marcel Proust, Alphonse Daudet, Pierre Loti, Sarah Bernhardt, Sacha Guitry, Catulle Mendes, King Edward VII and his wife Queen Alexandra, Pauline Viardot, and Jean Cocteau.
Being a poor or mediocre poet did not, one imagines, really bother Moore, given that he wrote in Confessions of a Young Man, "It does not matter how badly you paint, so long as you don't paint badly like other people." (9) As Frazier indicates, so much of Moore's poetic writing during the period was part of the tutelage of the artist-in-waiting: "He followed Lopez's curriculum for writing outrageous Baudelairean verse, took his weekly tutorial from Mallarme, and apparently aped the mannerisms of Catulle Mendes, doing his best to be a satanic, superaesthetic, and sophisticated poet" (p.